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In the Magazine This Month
December 2002/January 2003, Volume 4, Number 10

•  Features
•  Departments
  Journal
  Columns
Also in the December 2002/January 2003 issue

Features

Sir Ed's Fantasy Island
Set out on a thrill-sport odyssey on New Zealand's dramatic, sparsely populated South Island: Trekking around Mount Cook, kayaking in Fiordland, adrenaline feasting in Queenstown, and rock climbing in Wanaka. Your inspirations? European explorers, Maori gods, and Everest pioneer Sir Edmund Hillary. BY TOM CLYNES

Mungo Made Me Do It
Writer KIRA SALAK's aim was audacious: To paddle nearly 600 miles [966 kilometers] down the Niger River, a hazardous journey, inspired by legendary Scottish explorer Mungo Park, that no person had ever completed solo. She was slightly crazy, people thought; highly determined, she knew; and completely alone: in a little red boat, en route to Timbuktu.
Read excerpt >>

 

Online Extra
Photos From the River to Timbuktu
Racing down Africa's surly Niger River, our photographer captures timeless visions from Kira Salak's epic kayak expedition.

The Leading Edge
Faster. Farther. Easier. Better. Adventure sports have evolved—and in this special report on the state of the outdoor arts, we'll tell you how, with cutting-edge gear, hot destinations, the latest tips for your favorite sports, and more. BY STEVE CASIMIRO
• Canoe and Kayak: Wilderness paddling now (read excerpt).
• Mountain Biking: The free-ride revolution.
• Backpacking: Ultralight makes right.
• Rock Climbing: The new varieties of going vertical.
• Ski and Snowboard: Frontiers in fresh tracks.
• White Water: No river too big—or small.

 

Online Extra
Links to Leading-Edge Gear
Click to the gotta-have goods profiled in the December 2002/January 2003 issue.

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Departments

JOURNAL

Frontiers
Presenting the powderhouses: Winter's best huts, yurts, and lodges for staying and playing beyond the end of the roads. BY TINA LASSEN

Fast Breaks
California desert driving, long weekend sun trips, bargain airfares, and more.

Sports
Off-season scuba certification done right (no cold water), and the daring new pursuit of swooping—think skydiving with steering.

World on the Cheap
Explore the lakes, volcanoes, glaciers, blue icebergs, and tumbling rivers of Chile. Plus: Canyon country river rafting, on sale.

Hot Zones
ROBERT YOUNG PELTON on avoiding international taxi scams. Plus: Cell phone service around the world, and 'stans that deliver: the astounding peaks, deserts, and bazaars of Central Asia.

 

Online Extra
Forum: Your Hot Zones
What's your most harrowing travel tale from abroad?

Global Health
The vilest deeds of poison weeds—ivy, oak, and sumac—can be avoided if you know the best prevention and treatment tips.

Bringing It Home
Adventure party in your living room: Beers from Jamaica, Bavaria, and East Africa; music from Mali, Brazil, and beyond.

 

Online Extra
World Beat
Our music reviewer picks new CDs infused with aural sunshine. Get an earful of adventure.

Books
Humor, horses, and Mongolian mimes in Stanley Stewart's In the Empire of Genghis Khan, and the mysteries of Tibet's Tsangpo Gorge in Michael McRae's The Siege of Shangri-La. Plus: New tomes on the best in travel writing and the worst in the modern ski industry. BY ANTHONY BRANDT

Adventure on the Web
How do you safely pack camp-stove fuel bottles for plane travel? Do you need to learn local languages for a trek across the Sahara? We've got answers. Plus: New National Geographic Society TV and talks, and readers on going out of bounds.

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COLUMNS

The Life
You can't really understand an avalanche, says snow scientist Ed Adams, until you've been run over by one. Everyone have their transceivers ready? BY DAVID HOCHMAN
Read excerpt >>

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Also in the December/January Issue

From the Editor
Contributors
Letters
Travel Directory
Editorial Index

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