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In the Magazine This Month
November 2004, Volume 6, Number 9

• Features
• Departments
• Journal
• Also in the November Issue

Features

No Margin for Error
New Hampshire's 6,288-foot (1,917-meter) Mount Washington is just a few hours' drive from New York City and Boston, draws weekend warriors by the tens of thousands, and on bad days has worse weather than Antarctica. Since 1849, 134 climbers, hikers, and skiers have died there. Contributing editor LAURENCE GONZALES tallies the small missteps and bad decisions that add up to that grisly total on America's deadliest peak. Plus: America's most dangerous beaches, rivers, and deserts. Read excerpt >>

Return to Zootopia
Ecuador's Galápagos Islands have been the biggest name in ecotourism since Charles Darwin tossed his first iguana into the surf in 1835. Eminent Darwinist DAVID QUAMMEN returns to check up on the legendary bioreserve after a long absence, and finds that while serious adventure travel has transformed the Galápagos in the intervening years, the islands and their famous animal inhabitants have only changed for the better. Read excerpt >>

Photo Gallery
West Coast Editor Steve Casimiro takes on charismatic critters during a V.I.P. Galápagos tour. Enter gallery >>

Adventure Travel 2005: 25 Wild Horizons
Got a bit of Shackleton in you? Good. Exploratory trips are making a big comeback: In 2005, world-class outfitters will lead new expeditions to Afghanistan's mythical Hindu Kush, the forgotten cays of Mozambique, and Libya's forbidden Sahara. Closer to home are new trips in Alaska, Hawaii, Montana, and Honduras. There's never been a better time to broaden your wild horizons. Read excerpt >>

BY McKENZIE FUNK

Ancient Marks
It was while on assignment in Papua New Guinea that National Geographic photographer CHRIS RAINIER first noticed the intriguing similarities between traditional Polynesian tattoos and the needlework he'd seen in stateside shopping malls. Curiosity piqued, he set out on a seven-year, round-the-world quest to document body art—and to assemble an extraordinary portfolio of living, breathing masterpieces.

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Departments

JOURNAL

American Wilds
Big Bend's more than a lazy curve in the Rio Grande: With mountain vistas, crazy critters, and 200 miles of trails, it's a hiker's bonanza.

BY JAMES VLAHOS

Where Next
Rainforest numbers crunch: Hawaii squares off against Costa Rica in a battle for your greenbacks. Plus: An NG insider's secret Mexico.

BY MARK KIRBY

Pelton's World
Safe, secluded spots the State Department wants to scare you away from. Read excerpt >>

BY ROBERT YOUNG PELTON

City Escape
Vegas, baby! Where to paddle, climb, and (preferably) not lose your shirt in Sin City.

BY STACY WILLIS

Performance
Pilates, anyone? What trendy workout courses can offer to the adventure athlete. Plus: The truth about endorphins. Read excerpt >>

BY TED SPIKER

Books
Spiritual journeys into the world’s deepest gorge, and an indomitable, globe-trotting Brit.

BY ANTHONY BRANDT

First Person
Scottish film star Ewan McGregor talks about his round-the-world motorcycle ride and how he survived the worst highway in the world.

BY MARK KIRBY

The Essentials
Backcountry Skiing 101: from transceivers and shovels to bindings and skins, everything you need to be an off-piste powerhouse.

BY STEVE CASIMIRO

Gear: Digital Photos
Digital's here to stay, but snapping jaw-dropping photos requires more than just a camera. How to maximize your pixel potential. Read excerpt >>

BY JONATHAN BARKEY

The Leading Edge
Electric jackets, smart watches, MP3 sunglasses—is wearable tech finally for real?

BY STEVE CASIMIRO

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Also in the November 2004 Issue

From the Editor
Contributors
Letters
Adventure on the Web
Travel Directory
There & Back: Venice Read excerpt >>

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November 2004



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