ExplorersProjects

  • Picture of an erupting crater in Hawaii

    Announcing BioBlitz 2015

    Heating Things Up at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    More »

About the Blitz

Rocky Mountain National Park boasts one of the most expansive areas of alpine terrain in the United States as well as beautiful forests and mountain meadows. To better understand, appreciate, and protect this national treasure, the National Park Service and National Geographic Society are teaming up to host a 24-hour BioBlitz species count and a two-day Biodiversity Festival, August 24-25, 2012. Part scientific endeavor, part festival, and part outdoor classroom, BioBlitz will bring together 200 leading scientists and naturalists from around the country, thousands of local citizens of all ages, and nearly 1,000 students from around the state.

Activities to occur during the Rocky Mountain BioBlitz include:

Discovery Site Inventory Team Opportunities—REGISTER NOW!

Be part of an expert-led species inventory team to discover, count, map, and learn about the park’s diverse organisms, ranging from microscopic bacteria to towering pines. To ensure a spot on an inventory team, you must register online.

The Biodiversity Festival

Enjoy music, live animals, photography workshops, science demonstrations, hands-on activities provided by prominent science and environmental organizations, food, and art. This free, family event is open to explorers of all ages. No registration is required for the festival. Check out evening activities for Friday's “After Hours at the Festival.”

Ranger-Led Activities in the Park

Explore the park with expert rangers as your guides. From bird walks to nighttime exploration there is something for everyone. No registration required.

Additional links for the Rocky Mountain BioBlitz:

Additional Information for Scientists
Educational Resources
Volunteer With the Rocky Mountain BioBlitz
Explore Rocky Mountain National Park
• Questions and BioBlitz Updates Email: bioblitz@ngs.org
• Media Inquiries Email: kyle_patterson@nps.gov


New this year—sign up for text alerts! Keep up with the action from Rocky Mountain National Park and sign up for cell phone text alerts notifying you of the latest discoveries, the species count, and special events. Text "BIOBLITZ" to 50555.



Get more information about other technology opportunities, including Project Noah and FieldScope (PDF).



Past BioBlitzes

More Online

  • Photo: A tiny frog rests atop a fingertip.

    BioBlitz Around the World

    Wherever you are, you can participate in Project Noah's BioBlitz. How many species can you document and identify?

     

  • Photo: Kids spotting wildlife at the 2011 BioBlitz

    BioBlitz 2011 with Project Noah

    The smart phone has become a viable tool for researchers thanks to Project Noah, where it showcased its capabilities at the 2011 BioBlitz.

Sponsors

  • vz_fd_hp_b_p.jpg

    Verizon Foundation

    Verizon Wireless keeps the BioBlitz connected.

  • Logo: Geico

    Geico

    As a fan of planet Earth, GEICO is committed to being environmentally responsible.

  • southwest-logo-bioblitz.jpg

    Southwest

    Environmental stewardship is a responsibility Southwest Airlines takes seriously.

Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation

Rocky Mountain Park Animals

  • Photo: Porcupines

    Animals in the Park

    From mighty elk to rare boreal toads, Rocky Mountain National Park protects animals of the high south-central continental divide.

  • Photo: Male elk, or wapiti, forages for food under a thick blanket of snow

    Elk

    Learn about the animal Native Americans call "wapiti." Get the measure of these antlered giants that can tower some 9 feet tall.

  • Photo: Black bear mother and cub

    Black Bear

    Get to know North America's most common bear. Learn the logic behind the familiar refrain: "Please don't feed the bears."

  • Photo: Snowshoe hare sitting in the snow

    Snowshoe Hare

    Look carefully to spot this creature, whose snow-white winter coat helps it blend in with its snowy environment.

  • Photo: Porcupine on a gravel path

    Porcupine

    Can porcupines shoot their quills at predators? Get the pointed truth, plus other fascinating facts about these prickly rodents.

Videos

Listen: Explorer Interviews

Listen to Nat Geo Explorer Interviews

Fascinating Conversations From Our Weekly Radio Show—Nat Geo Weekend

  • 00:11:00 Bob Ballard

    Boyd heads out of the studio to join National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Bob Ballard aboard his vessel the E/V Nautilus. Currently in Turkey, Ballard tells Boyd about the many shipwrecks he is finding in the Mediterranean. You can follow Ballard and his team, live as they explore the ocean at www.nautiluslive.org.

  • 00:06:00 Valerie Clark

    National Geographic grantee Valerie Clark licks frogs for a living. As Clark tells Boyd, she’s not looking for Prince Charming. Instead, she is studying how the diet of frogs in Madagascar relates to the toxicity of their skin.

    • 00:11:00 Lee Berger Audio

      National Geographic grantee and paleoanthropologist Lee Berger has been searching for the fossils of human ancestors, but it was his 9-year-old son who stumbled upon the find of a lifetime: a partial skeleton that may very well change our understanding of the genus Homo.

    • 00:07:59 Brad Norman

      Some go swimming with dolphins or stingrays, Brad Norman, National Geographic Emerging Explorer and marine conservationist, talks about swimming with the largest fish in the world: the whale shark. Norman speaks with Boyd about his research concerning whale shark habitats, tracking and conservation.

    • 00:11:00 Losang Rabgey

      National Geographic Emerging Explorer Losang Rabgey has found her life's work in strengthening rural communities on the Tibetan plateau, which includes building schools to educate local students. Rabgey joins Boyd with updates on the successful work of Machik, the non-profit she founded and now directs.

    • National Geographic Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert capture astounding images of African wildlife in their beautiful films. The Jouberts live in the African bush alongside the lions and other animals they profile. They explain to Boyd that, because big cats are in such danger, their work is now focused on conservation projects such as the Cause an Uproar program.

    • 00:11:00 Nathan Wolfe

      National Geographic Emerging Explorer and virus hunter Nathan Wolfe says there is a disease pandemic lurking just around the corner. But, we can prepare ourselves.  Wolfe says there are even ways to harness and use the power of viruses. Wolfe joins Boyd to talk about his new book, The Viral Storm: The Dawn of a New Pandemic Age, which is changing the way we think about viruses.

      • National Geographic Emerging Explorer Joshua Ponte was a successful young English entrepreneur when, over breakfast one morning, his eye fell on a newspaper ad that said "Gorilla Reintroduction Program, Gabon." His life has never been the same since. Pursuing his passion for conservation, Ponte moved to a central African forest where 13 orphaned gorillas were being studied. Boyd talks with Ponte about the joys and dangers of raising young gorillas.

      • 00:11:00 Wade Davis

        How did the death and destruction of World War One lead young British climbers to attempt an epic conquest of Mount Everest? National Geographic Explorer in Residence Wade Davis answers that question in his new book “Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest.” Davis joins Boyd in the studio to chat about the book.

      • 00:11:00 Sylvia Earle

        National Geographic Explorer in Residence Sylvia Earle has been deeper undersea than any other woman. Earle is an oceanographer, explorer, author, lecturer, field scientist, and an inspiration to women around the world. She recently received the Royal Geographic Society’s 2011 Patron’s Medal. Boyd talks to Earle about some of her early dives in the Jim Suit.

      • (blurb here)
      • 00:08:00 Bruce Bachand

        Many people picture archaeology as the swashbuckling adventure portrayed in the Indiana Jones trilogy. But in reality, it can be much more tedious than discovering the Holy Grail and fighting Nazis. National Geographic grantee Bruce Bachand has been meticulously sewing a 3,000 bead necklace back together in Mexico after discovering a pre-Olmec burial site that housed a tribal chief and his wife, undisturbed for several centuries.

      • 00:09:00 Catherine Jaffee

        Turkey is famed for its honey, which is music to Boyd's ears—he has a notorious sweet tooth. He visited National Geographic grantee Cat Jaffee, a beekeeper who left her job in Washington, D.C. to make honey in rural Turkey. She says that bees harvest pollen from their surroundings: the best honey comes from bees with natural surroundings, large meadows, rather than urban environments. Most people, Jaffee says, eat honey that is basically a synthetic mix of sugars from all over the world.

      • Most of human history existed before the advent of GPS technologies that can pinpoint where we are at any time. National Geographic Fellow and ethnonavigation expert, Elizabeth Lindsey has taken it upon herself to understand what it was like for Polynesian explorers to colonize tiny, remote islands across the south Pacific Ocean. To better appreciate the skills it takes to study the clouds and winds in search of land, Lindsey plans to join a team of Polynesian women who are island-hopping using traditional methods: no GPS, no cellphones and no compass.

      • 00:11:00 Lucy Cooke

        Lucy Cooke