November 11, 1999

Intro
Meet the Team
March 31, 1999
April 2, 1999
April 5, 1999
April 8, 1999
April 11, 1999
April 19, 1999
April 21, 1999
April 25, 1999
April 27, 1999
April 30, 1999
May 2, 1999
May 4, 1999
May 5, 1999
May 6, 1999
May 14, 1999
May 15, 1999
May 17, 1999
May 19, 1999
May 22, 1999

Introduction

(Note: Nationalgeographic.com does not research or edit dispatches.)

To determine the height of the tallest mountain in the world, five climbers and eight Sherpas—aided by bottled oxygen—will make their way up Everest, taking global positioning system (GPS) readings in various spots on the way. They will also collect rock samples from as high as 25,000 feet (7,600 meters).

When the team finally reaches the summit in mid-May, they will take a GPS reading at the top of the world. In addition, they will leave a small weather station that can act as a live reporter.

The climbing team comprises four men and one woman. Three survey climbers are responsible for operating the GPS device and taking measurements; two videographers will record the expedition.

Mount Everest is an old friend to lead climber Pete Athans, who has been on the mountain 12 times and attained the summit five times. Charles Corfield is an experienced mountaineer trained in astrophysics and mathematics. Bill Crouse has climbed the Himalaya for ten years and has led expeditions in Nepal, Alaska, and Canada. Videographers Jeff and Kellie Rhoads have been climbing and guiding for 23 years.

Being on the rooftop of the world is amazing,” says Athans. “It’s a beautiful place, it’s a very stark place, and it’s obviously a very dangerous place.”

Everest Main