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Lewis and Clark
SHOWING RECORD: 5 of 20   Indian Breadroot
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image: Indian Breadroot
Photograph from Lewis and Clark Herbarium/Academy of Natural Sciences
Indian Breadroot

Pediomelum argophyllum



First Noted by Expedition
October 17, 1804, along the Cannonball River, North Dakota.
 

Description
Purplish blue flowers and palm-shaped leaves. The entire plant is covered with dense light-colored hairs.
 

Habitat
Prairies.
 

Range
Wisconsin and Illinois west to Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico.
 

Note
The edible root, which measures one and a half to two inches in length, resembles a dahlia tuber. It has a high starch and sugar content. Historically, Indian breadroots were harvested in late summer and eaten raw, boiled, roasted, or dried in the sun. The dried roots were generally ground between stones for flour to mix with soups and stews.
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