National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

January 16, 2011

This Week's Guests:

Dereck and Beverly Joubert
National Geographic Explorers in Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert are about to release their documentary The Last Lions. The Jouberts both join Boyd in the studio to talk about the big screen film, shot in the wetlands of Botswana’s Okavango Delta. The beautiful story showcases a determined lioness willing to risk everything to keep her cubs alive. Look for the film at a theater near you in early February.
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Robert Kunzig
Sometime in 2011 there will be seven billion people on this planet. Author Robert Kunzig writes about this development in “Seven Billion,” an article in the January National Geographic magazine. Kunzig tells Boyd that this is a momentous milestone, but we shouldn’t panic.
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Martin Wikelski
National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Martin Wikelski is a behavioral ecologist. This means he spends a lot of time following all kinds of animals. Wikelski followed cuckoos from Denmark to the Democratic Republic of the Congo; took a motorcycle across the Alps to shadow songbirds; and precisely measured a mass migration of bumblebees in Germany. Wikelski joins Boyd to talk about how what he’s learning might one day help predict natural disasters.
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Charles Kulander
Have the winter blues got you down? Well it may be time for a trip to the tropical island of Barbados. Author Charles Kulander writes about this special Caribbean island in his article “It’s a Wonderful Life,” in the January/February issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine. Kulander joins Boyd to talk about surfing and street tennis.
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David Braun
Join National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun as he shares some of the week’s hottest stories. Braun and Boyd discuss saving manatees and sea turtles.

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Jill Pruetz
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jill Pruetz studies Chimpanzees in Senegal. She estimates that all together she has spent over four years with the chimps. And in that time she has made some startling discoveries. Pruetz tells Boyd that most recently she has discovered that the chimps eat many more termites than anyone suspected.
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Matt Moniz
National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Matt Moniz climbed to the highest point in all 50 Unites States in just 43 days. And he is only 12 years old! Moniz tells Boyd he got hooked on climbing when he visited the Mount Everest base camp with his dad at age 8.
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Julian Laird
The Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, Norway was built to survive most dooms-day scenarios. It sits nearly 400 feet (123 meters) inside an Arctic mountain and contains some of humanities most precious resources: crop seeds! Julian Laird, Director of Development and Communications for the Global Crop Diversity Trust, explains why preserving seeds is so vital to our survival.
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Andrew McCarthy
Actor and author Andrew McCarthy recently took his 8-year-old son on a trip to Marrakech. McCarthy writes about how his son learned to bargain from some of the best bargainers in the world in the article “The Art of the Deal,” in the January/February issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine.

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Did You Know
In his regular Did You Know segment, Boyd says the world may feel crowded, but really humans themselves aren’t taking up that much space.

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