National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

December 15, 2007

This Week's Guests:

• Colin and Julie Angus circumnavigated the globe entirely on human power. National Geographic Adventure’s 2006 Adventurers of the Year, Colin and Julie talk with Boyd about their two-year-long journey hiking through the wilderness, biking on busy Eastern European roads and rowing alone for five months across the Atlantic Ocean.

Listen to this segment:
Part 1 | Part 2

• Tom Miller, editor of How I Learned English, talks with Boyd about the various ways immigrants learn English, including listening to Frank Sinatra records, watching “Three’s Company” and reading National Geographic Magazine.

Listen to this segment

• For two decades, Diana Walker was the White House photographer for Time magazine. In her new book, The Bigger Picture: 30 Years of Portraits, published by National Geographic, Walker showcases many of her yet-unpublished photos. Walker talks with Boyd about the challenges of getting her subjects to relax, as well as her experiences shooting politicians from Jimmy Carter to Hillary Clinton.

Listen to this segment

• Did you know we Americans spend 90% of our time indoors? The Green Guide’s Seth Bauer discusses the dangers of air pollution inside the home and things we can all do to solve the problem.

Listen to this segment

• Dr. Phil Manning talks with Boyd about one of the most rare dinosaur specimens ever unearthed. In 1999, a mummified Hadrosaur—bones, skin and all—was discovered in North Dakota. As a member of the “Dino Autopsy” team, Manning joins Boyd to talk about what we have recently learned from this remarkable piece of history.

Listen to this segment

• National Geographic Emerging Explorer Mireya Mayor is a regular visitor to Madagascar. Mayor tells Boyd about the three new lemur species she has discovered on these trips. And she explains how she is witnessing first hand the loss of lemur habitat across Madagascar.

Listen to this segment

• Arctic Alaska contains one of the world’s last great wildlife spectacles, a region dotted by thousands of lakes where millions of migratory birds come from all over the world to rear their young. Wildlife Conservation Society scientist Steve Zach tells Boyd how he and his colleagues are working to balance development and conservation near Teshekpuk Lake in Alaska.

Listen to this segment

• National Geographic Emerging Explorer Katy Croff is an underwater archeologist. In 1999, Croff joined a research expedition led by Robert Ballard to the Black Sea. Croff tells Boyd about the four shipwrecks she helped discover, each approximately 1,500 years old but extremely well preserved.

Listen to this segment

• Scientists thought the Wollemi Pine tree went extinct two million years ago. But, as Boyd explains, not long ago an Australian park ranger stumbled upon a small grove of living specimen in the mountains west of Sydney. And now anyone can own this living fossil. For $99.95 National Geographic is offering 10-inch (25-centimeter) Wollemi Pines that you can grow indoor or outside.

Listen to this segment



Advertisement