National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

April 05, 2008

This Week's Guests:

• Stick out your thumb and catch a ride…that’s what McKenzie Funk and Aaron Huey did all the way across Siberia. The two National Geographic grantees traveled the length of the newly completed Trans-Siberian Highway relying mostly on the caravans of car traders who take Japanese vehicles from the port in Vladivostock to the markets in the bigger cities in the west. Come along for the ride!

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Part 1 | Part 2

• As chief of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s coral reef ecosystem division, Rusty Brainard dives into the Pacific Ocean to monitor the diversity of coral reefs. He tells Boyd about what changes he is seeing.

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• Biologist Victoria Wadley recently joined a group of scientists aboard a research vessel bound for the Southern Ocean. Their mission was to take a census of marine life. Boyd and Wadley discuss the trip and the many unusual creatures they found in the cold deep water off the Antarctic.

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• Seth Bauer, Editorial Director of the Green Guide, speaks with Boyd about how getting a new refrigerator just might save you money.

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• Annie Griffiths Belt was one of the first female photographers hired at National Geographic. She talks to Boyd about traveling to far-flung destinations with her bulky camera equipment and her two children. Griffiths’ new book, A Camera Two Kids and a Camel, showcases many of the exquisite photos that she collected in her travels and tells the often funny and touching story of her travels and work.

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• Easter Island, also known as Rapa Nui, is the most remote inhabited place in the world. NG Weekend producer Ben Shaw traveled to this small island and spoke with archeologist Edmundo Edwards. For nearly 50 years Edwards has lived on Rapa Nui and studied the mysterious statutes that populate the island.

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• Zoologist and behavioral ecologist Martin Wikelski is developing an unprecedented animal migration database. He is comparing long-lost records with new findings to find how animal movement can inform us about climate change and even predict the weather!

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• Copying nature gave us Velcro. Now engineers are studying the natural world to make painless needles, more fuel-efficient cars and self-cleaning paint. Tom Mueller discusses these developments and his article, Biomimetics, in the April issue of National Geographic magazine.

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• What do a monkey-man in Marrakech and the U.S. economy have in common? Boyd found out in his recent travels to Morocco.

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