National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

April 19, 2008

This Week's Guests:

• Riding deadly avalanches and fighting off a shark attack is all in a day’s work for National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Johan Reinhard. His anthropological work has taken him deep underwater and high into the Andean mountains. Reinhard recovered the Inca ice maiden mummy on Peru's Mount Ampato, a discovery chosen by Time magazine as one of the world's ten most important scientific discoveries of 1995. Reinhard joins Boyd in the NG Weekend studio to share his stories.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• How would you like a glimpse of the future? National Geographic Traveler Editor in Chief Keith Bellows says he’s had a peek after attending the annual TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) conference. Bellows joins Boyd to talk about this gathering of great thinkers and talks about the conference that he calls dental floss for the mind.

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• Shangri-La just may exist on the Hawaiian island of Kaua’i. Joel Bourne writes about the magical and beautiful Na Pali coast in the April issue of National Geographic magazine. But Bourne tells Boyd that this lush valley shielded by 3,000-foot (914-meter) cliffs is under siege from a flood of visitors.

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• Which is better for the environment: aluminum cans or plastic bottles? Find out in the regular Green Guide segment with Seth Bauer, Editorial Director of the Green Guide. The answer may surprise you.

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• National Geographic Emerging Explorer, Losang Rabgey has found her life's work in the remote Tibetan villages of farmers, semi-nomads and nomads. She and Boyd go beyond the headlines of the recent conflict over Tibet to talk about effecting change on the ground. As founder and executive director of the non-profit organization Machik, Rabgey is working to strengthen and revitalize rural communities on the Tibetan plateau by building schools and establishing sustainable geotourism in the region.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• The peace symbol is 50 years old and still going strong. How did this simple sketch become such a powerful image? Ken Kolsbun, author of Peace: The Biography of a Symbol, tells Boyd the surprising story of the sign.

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• How does Valerie Clark determine if a frog is poisonous or not? She licks it! Clark joins Boyd in the studio to talk about her scientific work on frogs in Madagascar.

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• You’ve heard of the worm at the bottom of the tequila bottle. But what about snakes in your wine or toes in your whisky? Boyd tells a tale of cocktails gone wild.

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