National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

September 13, 2008

This Week's Guests:

• Paleontologist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno was looking for dinosaurs in Niger when a member of his team stumbled across a Stone Age graveyard. The bones he found tell the story of a Sahara once lush with plants and animals. He joins Boyd in the studio to talk about this startling discovery.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• What makes the human brain unique? In his new book Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique author Michael S. Gazzaniga explains how the human brain has evolved to give us language, morals, religion, and much, much more.

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• National Geographic grantee Kit Nelson recently discovered an exquisitely preserved, thousand-year-old mummy in Peru. Nelson tells Boyd how the mummy was disemboweled and decorated with scarlet paint, metal eye plates, and a tattoo.

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• Go green in the bedroom. Seth Bauer, editorial director of the Green Guide, tells you how to redecorate your bedroom in an environmentally healthy way.

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• J.J. Kelly and Josh Thomas are one third of the way through a 1,300-mile paddle from Skagway, Alaska to Seattle, Washington. During a break from the river, they join Boyd by phone to talk about surviving grizzly bears and the weather while living out of hand-made wooden kayaks.

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• In her new book The Score: How the Quest for Sex Has Shaped the Modern Man, journalist Fay Flam investigates why men will do just about anything to get the girl. It turns out modern man may have something to learn from the animal kingdom when it comes to sex.

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• Skirts are flying and hair is being pulled! Photographer Ivan Kashinsky joins Boyd to talk about Bolivia’s women wrestlers. Kashinsky took photos of the women competing in traditional petticoats and bowlers for an article in September’s National Geographic magazine.

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• Life-long wooden boat builder Joe Youcha runs the Alexandria Seaport Foundation. Youcha and ASF have taken more than 250 underprivileged kids — from high school dropouts to former gang members — and given them an employable, high-paying skill. He joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the success of his program.

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• Have you ever wondered what it would be like to kayak in a frozen margarita? Boyd tells us that’s what it felt like paddling through a frozen Lake Superior.

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