National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

November 01, 2008

This Week's Guests:

• Emmanuel de Merode is the director of Virunga National Park, home to most of the world's last mountain gorillas. But this week, rebels in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) have overtaken the headquarters of the park. Merode talks to Boyd via phone from Goma as rebel forces threaten to overrun the city.

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• What is your vision of paradise? That is the question that photo editor Bronwen Latimer put to a handful of National Geographic photographers. Their answers, compiled in a new National Geographic book titled Visions of Paradise, may surprise you.

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• Bill Schutt’s new book, Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood Feeding Creatures, is perfect reading for the Halloween season. Schutt joins Boyd to talk about bats, leaches, bed bugs, mosquitoes, and other creepy creatures.

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• Is there life on Mars? Steven Squyres and his team of researchers at the Jet Propulsion Lab sent two robots into space to find out just that. Squyres tells Boyd about the Mars rovers and what they’ve discovered so far.

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• Seth Bauer, editorial director of the Green Guide, says shopping for organic food may cost more now, but it will pay off in the long run.

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• Photographer Sam Abell joins Boyd in the studio to talk about braving cyclones in Australia and anacondas in the Amazon, just to get the perfect picture. Abell has worked for National Geographic for almost 40 years, and he has a new book out called The Life of a Photograph.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• Tom Miller’s book, Trading with the Enemy: A Yankee Travel’s Through Castro’s Cuba, was recently updated and released in paperback. Boyd and Miller talk about the changes coming to Cuba now that Fidel Castro has stepped down from power.

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• You’ve heard the stories—a painter sips turpentine instead of coffee; a pilot lands atop another plane; a climber misses a loop on the rope. Why do smart people do stupid things? That’s the question Laurence Gonzales answers in his book, Everyday Survival: Why Smart People Do Stupid Things. Gonzales and Boyd talk about how to prevent stupid and possibly deadly mistakes in everyday life.

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• Boyd tells the story of one of his own stupid mistakes while walking on a live volcano with his then 13-year-old son.

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