National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

November 15, 2008

This Week's Guests:

• For years, drug trafficking and political strife have made it impossible for tourists to enjoy Colombia’s natural beauty and culture. But now that’s starting to change. Tom Clynes’ article in this month’s National Geographic Adventure magazine features Colombia as one of the hottest new adventure destinations. Clynes tells Boyd what’s changed and what not to miss when you go.

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• Charles Beeker, professor of underwater archaeology at Indiana University, didn’t quite find buried treasure, but he did find a submerged pirate ship off the coast of the Dominican Republic. Beeker talks to Boyd about how he and his team identified the wreckage as the ship of Captain Kidd, who was hanged for being a pirate in 1701.

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• Chris Shearer, director of National Geographic’s My Wonderful World campaign, joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the activities and resources available through National Geographic for 2008 Geography Awareness Week, November 16-22.

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• Can darkness disappear? According to the cover story of November’s National Geographic magazine, it’s already happening. The story’s author, Verlyn Klinkenborg, talks to Boyd about the consequences of light pollution and what we can do to solve the problem.

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• Emily Main, senior editor of the Green Guide, tells listeners how dimming their lights and choosing the right bulbs can save money and energy.

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• For centuries, Borneo has been exploited for its natural resources. In the November issue of National Geographic magazine, Mel White writes about the decimation of the southeast Asian island’s populations of orangutans, rhinoceroses, and palm trees. White tells Boyd about what the inhabitants of Borneo are doing to save their island from total ruin.

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• Scientists have recently discovered unfrozen lakes and rivers flowing underneath the miles of ice on the continent of Antarctica. John Priscu, professor of ecology at Montana State University, tells Boyd about his research on the frozen continent and his hopes to discover organisms that have been living untouched in that water for over 20 million years. The trouble is that to get to that water, scientists have to drill through miles of ice, and if they don’t drill properly, they could cause a 3,000-foot geyser of water to erupt.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• Most people are afraid of close encounters with sharks and mountain lions, but what about unseen threats, like SARS or the plague? Ian Lipkin, professor of epidemiology and director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University, tells Boyd how he and his team isolate, identify, and eliminate infectious diseases before they can spread too far.

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• Boyd remembers the time he swam with crocodiles in Australia...and lived to tell us the tale.

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