National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

February 07, 2009

This Week's Guests:

• Pirates are as old as seafaring itself. But they’ve been especially active this past year along the Somali and Indonesian coasts. Author Alex Perry joined up with pirates on Babi Island off the northern tip of Indonesia and wrote about his experience in the February issue of National Geographic Adventure magazine. The article, titled “A Brief Trip to Pirate Island,” is adapted from his new book Falling Off the Edge: Travels Through the Dark Heart of Globalization (Bloomsbury USA).

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Part 1 | Part 2

• If you spend hours watching and making YouTube videos you might want to talk with Michael Wesch about getting college credit for your work. Professor Wesch, a 2009 National Geographic Emerging Explorer, is a cultural anthropologist and media ecologist at Kansas State University, who explores the impact of social media and digital technology on society and culture. Boyd talks with Wesch about his use of YouTube in the classroom.

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• Sixteen-time National Geographic grantee Jay Pasachoff has traveled the world watching the sun disappear. Pasachoff, an astronomer and professor at Williams College, has viewed and studied 48 solar eclipses. Pasachoff joins Boyd in the studio to talk about what he’s learned from staring at the sun.

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• As the Obama girls prepare to redecorate their new White House bedrooms, Emily Main, senior editor of the Green Guide, joins Boyd to give them some green tips.

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National Geographic magazine contributing author Neil Shea decided to climb New Hampshire’s Mount Washington with his brother—in the winter. Temperatures on the mountain can drop to -30° F (-34° C) or lower, and the wind speed at the summit once reached the world record of 231 miles per hour (372 kilometers per hour). Shea and his brother are both experienced climbers, but as Shea tells Boyd, the expedition was far from easy.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• Zarah Rahman and David Gilbert received a Young Explorers grant from National Geographic to do research on sustainable development in Sumatra. Rahman and Gilbert studied the onslaught of palm tree development replacing virgin rain forest. Rahman and Gilbert tell Boyd how demand for palm oil, for bio-fuel and as a food ingredient, is impacting locals and the environment.

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• Ten thousand years ago, the lion was the most widespread large mammal beside man. Today lions have disappeared from 80 percent of their former African ranges. In response, National Geographic has started a Big Cat Initiative to save the lions and other African big cats. David Margulies sits on the National Geographic Society’s Council of Advisors and he recently returned from a fact finding trip looking into the health of the lion population in Africa. Margulies joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his trip and the prospect of saving these endangered cats.

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• Boyd has had his share of close calls with big cats in Africa. He shares what it’s like to hear the roar of a lion at the front door of your canvass tent while in the African bush.

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