National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

February 14, 2009

This Week's Guests:

• For the article “Escape From North Korea,” in the February issue of National Geographic magazine, Tom O'Neill traveled to the border between North Korea and China. He and his wife followed three defectors from North Korea in a cloak and dagger operation to evade North Korean and Chinese officials on the road to Seoul, South Korea. O’Neill joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his article.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• How do you dig for 2,000-year-old artifacts when they are buried underwater? We ask 2009 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Beverly Goodman, an underwater researcher digging off the coast of Israel. Goodman tells Boyd how understanding the destruction of ancient Caesarea harbor might protect current residents from tsunamis.

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• Justina Ray is the Executive Director and Senior Scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. She recently co-authored a book titled Caribou and the North: A Shared Future. Dr. Ray joins Boyd in the studio to talk about saving the caribou.

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• Valentine’s Day is upon us. And this year it might be time for green roses, says Emily Main, senior editor of the Green Guide.

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• Neil deGrasse Tyson is the Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, but he may be better known for demoting Pluto from planet status. In his new book, The Pluto Files: The Rise and Fall of America's Favorite Planet, deGrasse Tyson details Pluto’s fall from planethood and the anger it aroused in both third-graders and scientists. DeGrasse Tyson tells Boyd why he thinks people in the United States get so worked up over the planet formerly known as Pluto.

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• Vietnam is home to five of the world's top 25 most endangered primate species. National Geographic grantee Katherine Workman has spent seven years in Vietnam watching one of those primates—the Delacour’s langur. Workman joins Boyd in the studio to tell him about her primate research and why it’s often work more suited for women than men.

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• What would you do if fire ants were crawling up your leg? You’d likely flick them off quickly. That’s just what a certain type of lizard has learned to do according to National Geographic grantee Tracy Langkilde. Langkilde joins Boyd to talk about fire ants, their every expanding territory and how they are changing the behavior of both people and animals.

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• The wild mustang is an icon of the western plains. But they may be disappearing. Photographer Melissa Farlow captured images of these horses for an article in the February issue of National Geographic magazine titled “Mustangs: Spirit of the Shrinking West.” Farlow joins Boyd in the studio to talk about why the number of wild horses in American is shrinking.

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• Boyd recalls watching horses and cowboys on the very first television that his parents brought home. TVs have come a long way since the first, fuzzy, black and white images. Boyd shares some of the milestones in television’s long history.

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