National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

February 21, 2009

This Week's Guests:

• Ultra athlete Sean Burch was looking for a challenge to celebrate the inauguration of President Obama, so he decided to run up Japan’s Mount Fuji in the winter! Burch, the author of a book titled Hyperfitness, set a record for the fastest winter ascent of the mountain making it to the summit in a little over four hours. Burch tells Boyd about running in snowshoes while enduring below zero temperatures and extremely high winds.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• National Geographic Emerging Explorer Shafqat Hussain was born in Pakistan’s lowlands, but always felt drawn to the mystery and majesty of its highest mountains, a region where endangered snow leopards — and villagers — struggle to survive. Yet both are finding relief through an insurance plan. Hussain tells Boyd about his innovative plan to protect the villagers’ livestock and save the snow leopard.

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• What do you do when you’re a mile inside an African cave and stuck quite literally between a rock and a hard place? National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee Trevor Frost had to answer that question when a member of his caving expedition team in Gabon found himself pinned under a boulder. Frost tells Boyd how the team reacted to save his friend’s life.

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• With the switch from analog to digital television almost upon us it just might be time to get a new TV. But if you want to go green should it be LCD or plasma? Emily Main, senior editor of the Green Guide, helps Boyd answer that question.

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• National Geographic Emerging Explorer Zeb Hogan is on a quest to find the world’s biggest fresh water fish. Just back from Thailand, he joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the nearly 800-pound stingray he found.

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Part 1 | Part 2

• Casey O’Hara used to be a mechanical engineer, but today he teaches physics and integrated science at Carlmont High School in Belmont, CA. Soon, as he tells Boyd, he’ll be headed on a PolarTREC expedition to Antarctica to work with researchers building a neutrino telescope to measure subatomic particles.

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• One billion people worldwide do not have access to safe drinking water. That is inexcusable says Peter Gleick, president of the Pacific Institute and author of the yearly book series The World’s Water: The Biennial Report on Freshwater Resources. Gleick talks with Boyd about solutions to the looming water crisis.

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• What do space aliens and Howdy Doody have in common? Boyd explains how they’ve both played a role in his life.

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