National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

June 13, 2009

This Week's Guests:

Mike Fay
Mike Fay has spent his life as a naturalist—from the Sierra Nevadas and the Maine woods as a boy, to Alaska and Central America in college, to North Africa and the depths of the central African forest and savannas for the last 25 years. Fay joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the plight of elephants on the African continent as well as his adventures as a castaway on a South Pacific atoll.
Read More

Listen to this segment:
Part 1 | Part 2

Holly Jones
Rats can wreak ecological havoc when introduced on a foreign island, decimating native bird and amphibian populations. But can those species recover if all the rats are removed? Holly Jones, a National Geographic Grantee traveled to New Zealand to find out. She joins Boyd to talk about the results of her studies.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Ellen Tynan
Ellen Tynan spent over a year traveling the world to collect photos and information about traditional boat building–from the double hulled canoes in the South Pacific to the reed boats of Chile. Tynan joins Boyd in the studio to share stories of her seagoing adventures.

Listen to this segment

Gary McKechnie
Gary McKechnie, author or USA 101: A Guide to America’s Iconic Places, Events and Festivals joins Boyd to suggest summer vacation destinations.
Buy the Book

Listen to this segment

Sylvia Earl
National Geographic Explorer in Residence Sylvia Earl has led more than 60 expeditions and logged more than 6,000 hours underwater, including leading the first team of women aquanauts during the Tektite Project in 1970 and setting a record for solo diving to a depth of 1,000 meters (3,300 feet). But her most recent diving trip was to the island of Palau where she swam with thousands of jellyfish. Earl shares with Boyd the trick of how not to get stung!

Listen to this segment

Don Belt
Followers of Jesus for nearly 2,000 years, native Christians today are disappearing from the land where their faith was born. Don Belt, author of the article “Forgotten Faithful,” in the June issue of National Geographic magazine, joins Boyd to talk about this modern day exodus from the holy land.
Read the Article

Listen to this segment

Elizabeth L. Bennett
When we think farms we usually think cows, horses, pigs and chickens. But Commercial wildlife farms in Southeast Asia are raising snakes, turtles, crocodiles, monkeys for meat and medicine. But Dr. Elizabeth L. Bennett, Director of Wildlife Conservation Society’s Hunting and Wildlife Trade program, tells Boyd these captive bred animals are actually hurting the wild populations.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Andy Rosenberg
As part of the global Census of Marine Life Andy Rosenberg, a professor at the University of New Hampshire, is trying to figure out how many fish there used to be in the seas before modern fishing began. Rosenberg tells Boyd that the shores off New Zealand used to team with roughly 30 times as many right whales and pods of blue whales used to darken the waters off England.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Notes
Boyd shares a story about his recent trip to a sustainable tea plantation in Kenya.
Read More

Listen to this segment



Advertisement