National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

September 19, 2009

This Week's Guests:

John Dau
National Geographic Emerging Explorer John Dau was one of the thousands of African males in southern Sudan attacked in the 1980s and '90s by the Arab Sudanese government. For 16 years, Dau was either on the run—from Arab militia and the Sudanese Army, from wild animals, or from starvation and thirst—or living in refugee camps. In 2001, he was among the lucky few chosen to immigrate to the United States, a place he had never heard of until he learned to read at the age of 17. Dau tells Boyd his remarkable story of survival and how he is now giving back to those still living in Sudan.
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Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Adam Ravetch & Sarah Robinson
Filmmakers Adam Ravetch & Sarah Robinson spent years in the Arctic filming polar bears and walruses for the National Geographic feature film Arctic Tale. Ravetch and Robinson tell Boyd about braving freezing temperatures and dangerous animals to get the shot.
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• In the NGW Green Guide segment, Boyd and Seth Bauer, the former editorial director of the Green Guide, confront the age old environmental question: plastic vs. paper.
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David Doubilet
National Geographic photographer David Doubilet is considered the leading underwater photographer in the world. Doubilet talks with Boyd about his trip to a reef off Indonesia’s Raja Ampat Islands.
Part 1 | Part 2

Payson Sheets
Approximately 1,400 years ago a Mayan village in El Salvador was buried by a volcanic eruption. Not long ago anthropologist Payson Sheets discovered an ancient field of manioc while excavating this village. This is the first evidence for cultivation of the calorie-rich tuber in the New World and Sheets shares the significance of his find with Boyd.
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Caitlin O'Connell-Rodwell
Elephants in Africa talk to each other by sending sound through the ground. And Caitlin O'Connell-Rodwell has been listening. O’Connell-Rodwell tells Boyd how elephants use foot stomping and low-frequency rumblings to generate seismic waves in the ground that can travel nearly 20 miles along the surface of the Earth.
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• In the NGW Green Guide segment, Paul McRandle, former deputy editor of the Green Guide, tells Boyd about the dangers of microwave popcorn.
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