National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

June 12, 2010

This Week's Guests:

Jean-Michel Cousteau
Legendary underwater explorer and filmmaker Jacques-Yves Cousteau was born 100 years ago, on June 11, 1910. To mark the centenary of his birth, National Geographic Books is publishing a memoir by his eldest son, Jean-Michel Cousteau, the noted French environmentalist, educator and film producer. Cousteau joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his father and the Gulf oil spill.
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Nick Lane
Where does DNA come from? What is consciousness? Why do we die? Biochemist and author Nick Lane tries to answer some of these questions in his new book Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution. Lane joins Boyd to talk about the book.
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Ken Banks
National Geographic 2010 Emerging Explorer Ken Banks has never monitored elections in Africa, run a rural healthcare network in India, stocked pharmacies with malaria medication, or brought crucial pricing information to farmers in El Salvador. Yet the computer software program he created does all that and more. Banks joins Boyd to talk about how he’s using software to make a difference in the world.
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David Braun
France is known for its wine and cheese. Not so much for its bears. But that might be changing, says David Braun, head of National Geographic's daily online news. Braun joins Boyd to talk about the news you didn’t know you needed to know.
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Tom Carter
Tom Carter recently covered every province in China with his camera. Now he’s moved on to India, a land that he says has a different festival every day. Carter joins Boyd by phone to talk about getting arrested and making his way onto the silver screen in India.
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Tim Berra
National Geographic grantee and Ohio State University professor Tim Berra is the author of Charles Darwin: The Concise Story of an Extraordinary Man. While writing his book, Berra began to wonder about Darwin’s own genes. Did his marriage to his first cousin make his offspring not as fit for survival? Berra thinks he has an answer and he shares the evidence with Boyd.
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Barbara Voorhies
• National Geographic grantee Barbara Voorhies has discovered a 4,400-year-old scoreboard in Mexico that may be the oldest evidence for gaming and gambling in the Americas. Voorhies joins Boyd in the studio to talk about her find.

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Christine Lee
Ancient skulls talk to National Geographic 2010 Emerging Explorer Christine Lee. They tell stories of long-forgotten cultures, conflicts, lifestyles and love affairs. Lee joins Boyd to talk about her work as a bio-archaeologist and how she combines physical anthropology and archaeology to study human remains, coaxing secrets from skeletons and civilizations millennia old.
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Boyd Matson
Boyd shares a story of time travel along Route 66 in Arizona.

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