National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

July 31, 2010

This Week's Guests:

Wes Skiles
A tribute to National Geographic photographer Wes Skiles, whose work is on the cover of the August issue and who tragically passed away in a diving accident last week. We’re airing a recent interview with Skiles about his adventures diving in the blue holes of the Bahamas, where he encountered poisonous gases, strange creatures, and the bones of native peoples that may not have gone willingly.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Kenny Broad
Continuing our tribute to Wes Skiles, National Geographic magazine editor Chris Johns explains what made Skiles such an incredible photographer and cinematographer. Then, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Kenny Broad shares some memories of diving with Skiles.

Listen to this segment

John Waterman
Author John Waterman of the new book Running Dry explains how all the manmade dams and diversions on the Colorado River have turned the once raging rapids into—by the end—a mere trickle. Waterman joins Boyd to discuss the devastating effects of these developments on the river’s ecosystems, and how we can change our water habits to make a difference.
Get the Book

Listen to this segment

Kyler Abernathy
National Geographic’s own “Crittercam” expert Kyler Abernathy is a pro at planting cameras on various animals in order to capture how they behave when we humans aren’t watching. Abernathy tells Boyd how you put a camera on a whale shark—the biggest fish in the sea—and how you get it back.

Listen to this segment

David Braun
Join National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun to meet a cat that has learned birdcalls in order to lure in prey. Then, how the Amazon rain forest lost millions of trees to a recent storm. Braun joins Boyd to talk about the news you didn’t know you needed to know.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Sebastian Junger
Reporter and filmmaker Sebastian Junger spent a year embedded with a platoon in Afghanistan’s most deadly combat region. Armed only with his camera, he went through everything the soldiers went through, including daily fire, losing friends and the inability to ask the officers above you, “Why?” Junger just released the book War and the documentary Restrepo, both detailing what he experienced.
Get the Book

Listen to this segment

Steve Winter
Armed guards, charging rhinos and elusive tigers. It’s all in a day’s work for National Geographic photographer Steve Winter, whose photos of India’s Kaziranga National Park are featured in the July magazine. How to photograph a tiger that doesn’t want to be seen, how to escape a mother rhino who is after your Jeep, and more.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Helen James
When Smithsonian curator of birds Helen James travels to Hawaii, she spends more time deep in lava caves than lounging on the beach. James joins Boyd to talk about the bones of extinct birds she has discovered, and what we can learn from them.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Katy Croff-Bell
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Katy Croff-Bell is part of the team on the Nautilus expedition, which hopes to use remotely operated equipment to investigate the deepest depths of the Mediterranean. Croff-Bell joins Boyd to explain what they’re looking for and what they’ll do when they find it.
Read More

Listen to this segment

Boyd Matson
To conclude our tribute to the great Wes Skiles, Boyd shares a story about diving with Skiles in Florida to photograph the manatees and mermaids of Weeki Wachee Springs.

Listen to this segment



Advertisement