National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

August 07, 2010

This Week's Guests:

Freddie Wilkinson
Freddie Wilkinson, a seasoned climber himself, just completed a book about a climbing tragedy on K2, the mountain second only to Everest in height, where 11 men lost their lives. Wilkinson especially focuses on the Nepali Sherpas, who risked their lives to save other climbers and in one case perished in the process.
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Roger Tomlinson
Roger Tomlinson won National Geographic’s Alexander Graham Bell medal for inventing the Geographic Information System (GIS), which made it possible to digitize maps—the forerunner of Google Earth. How the GIS revolutionized life as we know it.

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Marybeth Bond
Marybeth Bond, author of many books on women’s travel, took her own advice and hit the road with her daughter. Far from the shopping and sightseeing she describes in her books, the pair is biking across the country. Bond calls Boyd from the road to share some scenes and stories from the journey.
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David Braun
Join National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun to observe hundreds of alligators engaging in “cooperative feeding.” Then, how a damming project on the Mekong river will put the world’s fish supply in jeopardy. Braun joins Boyd to talk about the news you didn’t know you needed to know.
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Tim Hetherington
Filmmaker and war reporter Tim Hetherington spent a year embedded with a platoon in Afghanistan’s most deadly combat region. Armed only with his camera, he went through everything the soldiers went through, including daily fire, losing friends and the inability to ask the officers above you, “Why?” The result of this work is the documentary Restrepo, a harrowing look at the truth of war.
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David de Rothschild
National Geographic Emerging Explorer David de Rothschild calls in from Sydney, Australia, after successfully crossing the Pacific Ocean aboard his unconventional ship called the Plastiki, which is crafted from thousands of used plastic bottles. De Rothschild tells tales from the voyage, then explains how human wastefulness is hurting the oceans, and what we can do about it.
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Boy Scouts of America
The National Geographic Team is reporting to you from the field! Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, to be specific, where the Boy Scouts of America held their 100th anniversary Jamboree. Join us whizzing down the zip line, lining on the shooting range, and on a trip down Boyd’s Boy Scout memory lane.

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Bryan Smith
National Geographic Grantee Bryan Smith is part of a team rafting this summer in Eastern Siberia, charting rivers that have never been explored before. His project, as he explains to Boyd, is part excitement, part scientific inquiry. Why are fish doing so well in these rivers? How did the team survive going over a 60-foot waterfall?
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Did You Know—Five-Second Rule
Boyd explores the truth and fiction of the “Five-Second Rule,” which should be re-named the “Zero Second Rule” in this week’s Did You Know?

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