National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

September 11, 2010

This Week's Guests:

Daniel Everett
Daniel Everett, professor of languages, literatures, and cultures at Illinois State University tells Boyd about his adventures as a missionary in the Amazon rain forest among the Pirahã tribe. Everett’s new book, Don’t Sleep, There Are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle, talks about how the Pirahã changed his life and describes his ground-breaking discoveries about their language that challenge conventional linguistic theories.

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Part 1 | Part 2

Elena Garcea
You wouldn’t know to look at it today, but 10,000 years ago, the Sahara was a lush, green landscape inhabited by human beings. Archaeologist Elena Garcea joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the human remains and artifacts she and her team have found in an area known as the “Green Sahara.”

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Ian Lipkin
Most people are afraid of close encounters with sharks and mountain lions, but what about unseen threats, like SARS, or the plague? Ian Lipkin, professor of epidemiology and director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University, tells Boyd what he and his team do to isolate, identify and eliminate infectious diseases before they can spread too far.

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Emily Main
Emily Main, senior editor of the Green Guide, tells Boyd about the benefits of eating in.

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Leah Bendavid-Val and Mark Jenkins
Being a National Geographic writer/photographer is hard work—and even more so in the days before digital photos, frequent air travel, and cell phones. National Geographic writers Leah Bendavid-Val and Mark Jenkins visit Boyd in the studio to talk about four of the field writers and photographers who helped establish National Geographic’s tradition of excellence. Bendavid-Val and Jenkins profile those men in the new book, Odysseys and Photographs: Four National Geographic Field Men.

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Birgit Buhleier
Sable Island off the coast of Nova Scotia is known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic because of the hundreds of ships that have wrecked there. But it’s a welcoming home to tens of thousands of gray seals. Birgit Buhleier of National Goegraphic’s Crittercam unit joins Boyd in the studio to talk about her recent expedition to Sable Island, where she and her team attached cameras to eight gray seals in hopes of learning about their eating habits.

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Renée Friedman
Egyptologist Renée Friedman has been digging in Hierakonpolis, the southern capital of ancient Upper Egypt, for the past 25 years. Friedman joins Boyd in the studio to tell him about her discovery of an Egyptian brewery and what could be the world’s first zoo.

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Lisa Dabek
Lisa Dabek is director of conservation at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, Washington. Dabek tells Boyd about the work she’s doing to preserve the habitat of a rare species of tree kangaroos in Papua New Guinea.

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Story-Witnessing Tribal Warfare
Boyd remembers the tribal warfare he witnessed on his first trip to Papua New Guinea many years ago.

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