National Geographic Radio Programs

National Geographic Weekend


National Geographic Weekend Image: SRN Radio logo

October 16, 2010

This Week's Guests:

Colin Walker
More than 70 live geckos have taken up residence at the National Geographic Museum as part of the new exhibit “Geckos: Tails to Toepads.” The geckos represent 18 species from all over the world and include such superlatives as the peacock day gecko and the satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Zookeeper Colin Walker gives Boyd a behind-the-scenes tour, demonstrating how the geckos can bark and bite.
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Jerry Glover
What if a new grain of wheat holds the key to saving biodiversity, polluted ecosystems and starving people? Agroecologist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jerry Glover is working on the case. Glover explains to Boyd why perennial plants may hold the answer to many of our environmental problems.
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Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas
English brothers Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas were on safari in Kenya when they ran across an unusual sight: a pink hippopotamus. The pair managed to get some great photos of the odd-looking animal and posted them to their blog. Will joins Boyd to talk about the encounter.
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Danny Clinch
Danny Clinch is one of the premier music photographers, photographing artists from Johnny Cash to Tupac Shakur. Clinch joins Boyd to talk about his work and his participation in the National Geographic Live event “Music on…Photography.”
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David Braun-NG News
Join National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun as he shares some of this week’s hottest stories. Braun sits down with Boyd to talk killer pollution from jet airplanes and birds with body odor.
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David Quammen
In 1960 an animal lover with no scientific training set up camp in the Gombe Stream Game Reserve to observe chimpanzees. Today Jane Goodall’s name is synonymous with the protection of a beloved species. Author David Quammen joins Boyd to talk about his article, “Fifty Years at Gombe,” in the October 2010 issue of National Geographic magazine.
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Anne Rimoin
National Geographic grantee Anne Rimoin is an infectious disease epidemiologist. She says the eradication of smallpox has had an unintended consequence: the emergence of a new virus called monkeypox. Rimoin joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the dangers of monkeypox.
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Julia Clark
Penguins weren’t always black and white. National Geographic grantee Julia Clark has discovered evidence of a 36-million-year-old penguin that stood nearly as tall as a man and sported shades of red and gray. Clark, a paleontologist at the University of Texas at Austin, joins Boyd to talk about the fossil find.
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Alex Hristov
A dash of spice could help prevent bovine burps says Alex Hristov, an assistant professor of dairy nutrition at Penn State. Cows in the U.S. emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane, a potent greenhouse gas per year. But as Hristov tells Boyd, oregano may cut cow emissions of methane by 40 percent.
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Story-Wildlife Watching
In his regular Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd explains how he can spend hours watching wildlife, although the rest of his family doesn’t always enjoy the experience.

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