Archives

Episode 1115—Air Date: April 9, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about braving a lava lake, touring with music icon Moby, poison-resistant fish, bringing the Civil War to life, perfume for capuchin monkeys, surviving a charging gorilla, Arabic hip-hop, a floating park in New York City, how to pack for life, and slogging through alligator-infested waters in Gabon.

HOUR 1

National Geographic contributing photographer Carsten Peter always gets the hottest assignments—literally. From descending into a sweltering crystal cave to escaping flying molten lava, Peter specializes in extreme adventures. In National Geographic Channel‘s Man vs. Volcano, Peter and a group of scientists journey into the crater of Mount Nyiragongo, Africa's most active volcano. The adventure is also documented in the April issue of National Geographic magazine. (See Video) (Read Article)

• Musician and DJ Moby consistently draws huge crowds, but, he says, life on the road can be lonely. Moby joins Boyd to talk about his new album Destroyed, and his hidden passion for photography­­­­—a subject that he will explore in his upcoming talk in Washington, D.C., as part of the National Geographic Live! “Music on…Photography” series. (National Geographic Events)

• Bottom-feeding fish in the Hudson River are disproving the notion that evolution must occur over thousands of years. The fish have developed a gene that renders them immune to the toxic effects of PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, from the 1940s to 1970s, distinguishing the species as one of the world’s fastest evolving populations. Isaac Wirgin, an associate professor of environmental medicine at New York University’s School of Medicine, published the findings and joins Boyd to talk about what this evolutionary change means for other fish and for humans. (National Geographic News)

Kenneth Morris is a descendent of two of the most well-known heroes of the Civil War: Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington. In a new television special, Civil Warriors: Free At Last, the National Geographic Channel joins Morris as he follows the trails of his famous ancestors. The program airs on April 11 at 8 p.m. (Related Video)

• National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun shares some of the week’s hottest stories, including monkey urine perfume. (National Geographic News)

HOUR 2

Allard Blom is the managing director of the Congo Basin for the World Wildlife Fund. Blom joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his work establishing a gorilla habituation program in the Central African Republic. Blom also shares the secret to surviving a charging gorilla: simply look away.

• The Arab world has seen a lot of turmoil in recent months. While people are rebelling in the streets, Arabic hip-hop artists are also making their voices heard. Boyd speaks with Yassin Alsalman, better known by his stage name “The Narcicyst,” about his music and his message. (Yassin Alsalman’s Web Site)

• Where do you go to get away if you live in one of the biggest cities in the world? New Yorkers can now float above their busy streets by journeying to a new park known as the High Line. Paul Goldberger, author of Miracle Above Manhattan from the April issue of National Geographic magazine, talks with Boyd about the new park and how it came to life. (National Geographic Article)

• Travel writer Janice Booth took to heart the old adage, “Get back on the horse.” After being thrown off her horse, Booth got back on, despite still being in a cast from her accident. Booth relates this and other stories in her new book from National Geographic, Only Pack What You Can Carry, and joins Boyd to talk about what she has learned from her own adventures and travels. (Buy the Book At the Nat Geo Store)

• Boyd talks about the trials and tribulations of trekking through the Gabon jungle with National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1115—Air Date: April 9, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Carsten Peter

    National Geographic contributing photographer Carsten Peter always gets the hottest assignments—literally. From descending into a sweltering crystal cave to escaping flying molten lava, Peter specializes in extreme adventures. In National Geographic Channel‘s “Man vs. Volcano,” Peter and a group of scientists journey into the crater of Mount Nyiragongo, Africa's most active volcano. The adventure is also documented in the April issue of National Geographic magazine.

  • 00:09:00 Moby

    Musician and DJ Moby consistently draws huge crowds, but, he says, life on the road can be lonely. Moby joins Boyd to talk about his new album “Destroyed,” and his hidden passion for photography­­­­—a subject that he will explore in his upcoming talk in Washington, D.C., as part of the National Geographic Live! “Music on… Photography” series. Get tickets to the event.

  • 00:06:00 Issac Wirgin

    Bottom-feeding fish in the Hudson River are disproving the notion that evolution must occur over thousands of years. The fish have developed a gene that renders them immune to the toxic effects of PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, from the 1940s to 1970s, distinguishing the species as one of the world’s fastest evolving populations. Isaac Wirgin, an associate professor of environmental medicine at New York University’s School of Medicine, published the findings and joins Boyd to talk about what this evolutionary change means for other fish and for humans.

  • 00:08:00 Kenneth Morris

    Kenneth Morris is a descendent of two of the most well-known heroes of the Civil War: Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington. In a new television special, “Civil Warriors: Free At Last,” the National Geographic Channel joins Morris as he follows the trails of his famous ancestors. The program airs on April 11 at 8 p.m.

  • National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun shares some of the week’s hottest stories, including monkey urine perfume.

  • 00:11:00 Allard Blom

    Allard Blom is the managing director of the Congo Basin for the World Wildlife Fund. Blom joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his work establishing a gorilla habituation program in the Central African Republic. Blom also shares the secret to surviving a charging gorilla: simply look away.

  • 00:09:00 Yassin Alsalman

    The Arab world has seen a lot of turmoil in recent months. While people are rebelling in the streets, Arabic hip-hop artists are also making their voices heard. Boyd speaks with Yassin Alsalman, better known by his stage name “The Narcicyst,” about his music and his message.

  • 00:06:00 Paul Goldberger

    Where do you go to get away if you live in one of the biggest cities in the world? New Yorkers can now float above their busy streets by journeying to a new park known as the High Line. Paul Goldberger, author of “Miracle Above Manhattan” from the April issue of National Geographic magazine, talks with Boyd about the new park and how it came to life.

  • 00:08:00 Janice Booth

    Travel writer Janice Booth took to heart the old adage, “Get back on the horse.” After being thrown off her hose, Booth got back on, despite still being in a cast from her accident. Booth relates this and other stories in her new book from National Geographic, “Only Pack What You Can Carry,” and joins Boyd to talk about what she has learned from her own adventures and travels.

  • Boyd talks about the trials and tribulations of trekking through the Gabon jungle with National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay.