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Episode 1118—Air Date: April 30, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about kite skiing the Northwest Passage, catching the world’s most notorious butterfly smuggler, smartphone apps for your outdoor adventures, "Indiana Jones and the Adventure of Archaeology" mummified puppies, saving the world’s pristine reefs, grassroots environmental efforts in Texas, Mongolian travel itineraries, surfing breakers in Bali, and taking drugs to travel.

HOUR 1

Sarah and Eric McNair-Landry are a brother and sister team who have kite skied across Greenland and kite buggied through Mongolia. Now they are attempting to journey 1,800 miles across the Northwest Passage on kite skis. Boyd talks to the pair via satellite phone as they embark on their latest adventure.

• In her new book, Winged Obsession: The Pursuit of the World's Most Notorious Butterfly Smuggler, Jessica Speart tells the story of U.S. Fish and Wildlife agent Ed Newcomer. Despite his fear of insects, Newcomer goes undercover to befriend, and eventually capture, the kingpin of butterfly smugglers.

• Going for a hike? There’s an app for that. Steve Casimiro, National Geographic’s gear guru, and his team at the Adventure Journal blog, tested over 700 smartphone apps designed for outdoor adventures. He shares some of the best outdoor apps with Boyd.

• Now you can enter the world of Indiana Jones and experience the adventure of field archaeology. Lucasfilm Ltd. and National Geographic have teamed up to bring you “Indiana Jones and the Adventure of Archaeology,”, an exhibit based on the Indiana Jones franchise. National Geographic Fellow and archaeologist Fred Hiebert joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the traveling exhibit.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, shares stories of mummified dogs and firefighting electric wands.

HOUR 2

• We last talked with National Geographic Fellow Enric Sala from the deck of a Chilean navy vessel as he prepared to go scuba diving off Salas y Gómez Island in the Pacific Ocean. Sala takes a break from diving to talk with Boyd about swimming with sharks and many other creatures in the newly created Salas y Gómez marine reserve.

• When Hilton Kelley returned to his hometown of Port Arthur, Tex., he was dismayed to find that the residents had fallen ill to industrial pollution. Kelley decided something had to be done, so he organized a grassroots movement to clean up the air by pressuring local oil refineries to reduce harmful emissions. As a result, Kelley has been awarded the 2011 Goldman Environmental Prize.

• Twenty years ago, Mongolia was hardly a tourist destination, but now Mongolia is a hotspot destination for Westerners, thanks—in part—to Jalsa Urubshurow, an American Mongolian born and raised in New Jersey. A trip to his ancestral homeland in 1990 inspired him to build the Three Camel Lodge and found the Nomadic Expeditions travel company. Boyd talks to Urubshurow about touring Mongolia.

• Legendary surfer Rob Machado spent six months in Bali riding breakers, and filmmaker Taylor Steele was there to document the action on film. Together they created the surf movie, Melali: The Drifter Sessions. Machado and Steele will visit National Geographic this weekend to screen their upcoming film, which will include a live performance by Melali Sessions Band, of which Machado is a member.

Boyd confesses that he’s hopped up on drugs—medicinal drugs to treat typhoid fever and malaria in preparation for his upcoming trip to Africa.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1118—Air Date: April 30, 2011

  • Sarah and Eric McNair-Landry are a brother and sister team who have kite skied across Greenland and kite buggied through Mongolia. Now they are attempting to journey 1,800 miles across the Northwest Passage on kite skis. Boyd talks to the pair via satellite phone as they embark on their latest adventure.

  • 00:09:00 Jessica Speart

    In her new book, Winged Obsession: The Pursuit of the World's Most Notorious Butterfly SmugglerJessica Speart tells the story of U.S. Fish and Wildlife agent Ed Newcomer. Despite his fear of insects, Newcomer goes undercover to befriend, and eventually capture, the kingpin of butterfly smugglers.

  • 00:06:00 Steve Casimiro

    Going for a hike? There’s an app for that. Steve Casimiro, National Geographic’s gear guru, and his team at the Adventure Journal blog, tested over 700 smartphone apps designed for outdoor adventures. He shares some of the best outdoor apps with Boyd.

  • 00:08:00 Fred Hiebert

    Now you can enter the world of Indiana Jones and experience the adventure of field archaeology. Lucasfilm Ltd. and National Geographic have teamed up to bring you “Indiana Jones and the Adventure of Archaeology,” an exhibit based on the Indiana Jones franchise. National Geographic Fellow and archaeologist Fred Hiebert joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the traveling exhibit.

  • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, shares stories of mummified dogs and firefighting electric wands.

  • 00:11:00 Enric Sala

    We last talked with National Geographic Fellow Enric Sala from the deck of a Chilean navy vessel as he prepared to go scuba diving off Salas y Gómez Island in the Pacific Ocean. Sala takes a break from diving to talk with Boyd about swimming with sharks and many other creatures in the newly created Salas y Gómez marine reserve.

  • 00:09:00 Hilton Kelley

    When Hilton Kelley returned to his hometown of Port Arthur, TX, he was dismayed to find that the residents had fallen ill to industrial pollution. Kelley decided something had to be done, so he organized a grassroots movement to clean up the air by pressuring local oil refineries to reduce harmful emissions. As a result, Kelley has been awarded the 2011 Goldman Environmental Prize.

  • 00:06:00 Jalsa Urubshurow

    Twenty years ago, Mongolia was hardly a tourist destination, but now Mongolia is a hotspot destination for Westerners, thanks—in part—to Jalsa Urubshurow, an American Mongolian born and raised in New Jersey. A trip to his ancestral homeland in 1990 inspired him to build the Three Camel Lodge and found the Nomadic Expeditions travel company. Boyd talks to Urubshurow about touring Mongolia.

  • 00:08:00 Rob Machado

    Legendary surfer Rob Machado spent six months in Bali riding breakers, and filmmaker Taylor Steele was there to document the action on film. Together they created the surf movie, Melali: The Drifter Sessions. Machado and Steele will visit National Geographic this weekend to screen their upcoming film, which will include a live performance by Melali Sessions Band, of which Machado is a member.

  • Boyd confesses that he’s hopped up on drugs—medicinal drugs to treat typhoid fever and malaria in preparation for his upcoming trip to Africa.