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Episode 1128—Air Date: July 9, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about almost becoming breakfast for a polar bear, why vultures can protect you from rabies, looking for life on an icy moon of Jupiter, high-flying geese, running across America, collecting leeches in Borneo, re-routing rivers in Northern California, fulfilling the National Geographic mission, and celebrating the Fourth of July a little too hard.

HOUR 1

• National Geographic grantee Sarah McNair-Landry and her brother, Eric McNair-Landry, just finished kite-skiing 2,050 miles (3,300 kilometers) through the Northwest Passage. They faced hungry polar bears and bitter cold during the 85-day trek. The brother-and-sister duo join Boyd to talk about the adventure. Read Sarah and Eric’s blog.

• His research is for the birds, and the birds thank him. Boyd talks with National Geographic Emerging Explorer Çağan Şekercioğlu about how crucial birds are to our ecosystems and how the disappearance of many of these birds can have drastic consequences.

• Are we alone in the universe? Many have attempted to answer this age-old question, but none has succeeded. National Geographic Emerging Explorer Kevin Hand attempts to change that with his research on Europa, a moon of Jupiter that sounds like a place straight out of a science fiction film. He tells Boyd about a planned expedition to this distant moon and what he hopes to find beneath the icy surface.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about the highest-flying bird in the world.

HOUR 2

• Ultra-marathon runner Dean Karnazes leads by example. Having just run across the United States, Karnazes stops in to give running advice to Boyd. Karnazes also discusses his new book 26.2 Stories of Blisters & Bliss.

• Expert jungle guide Ben Duncan leads Boyd through the Borneo jungle in search of orangutans. While Duncan helps Boyd spot the great ape, they end up finding many more leeches.

• National Geographic Young Explorer and photographer Jeff Enlow documents changes in California's river delta. Enlow captures the mixture of saltwater and freshwater, nature and industrialization in his photos. Farmers and all who buy from them will be affected by changes to these waterways.

Terry Garcia, Executive Vice President of Mission Programs at National Geographic, joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the work National Geographic does to support scientists and explorers in the field. Garcia talks to Boyd about the eccentric and passionate people he meets every day. Garcia is departing National Geographic to serve as Deputy Secretary of Commerce.

Boyd shares stories of his July 4th celebration in Telluride, Colorado, participating in the annual parade and joining a group called “Men Without Rhythm.” Surfing his way to a cheeseburger paradise, Boyd gets a tattoo of Tinker Bell as a souvenir.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1128—Air Date: July 9, 2011

  • National Geographic grantee Sarah McNair-Landry and her brother, Eric McNair-Landry, just finished kite-skiing 2,050 miles (3,300 kilometers) through the Northwest Passage. They faced hungry polar bears and bitter cold during the 85-day trek. The brother-and-sister duo join Boyd to talk about the adventure. Read Sarah and Eric’s Blog.

  • His research is for the birds, and the birds thank him. Boyd talks with National Geographic Emerging Explorer Çağan Şekercioğlu about how crucial birds are to our ecosystems and how the disappearance of many of these birds can have drastic consequences.

  • 00:08:00 Kevin Hand

    Are we alone in the universe? Many have attempted to answer this age-old question, but none has succeeded. National Geographic Emerging Explorer Kevin Hand attempts to change that with his research on Europa, a moon of Jupiter that sounds like a place straight out of a science fiction film. He tells Boyd about a planned expedition to this distant moon and what he hopes to find beneath the icy surface.

  • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about the highest-flying bird in the world.

  • 00:11:00 Dean Karnazes

    Ultra-marathon runner Dean Karnazes leads by example. Having just run across the United States, Karnazes stops in to give running advice to Boyd. Karnazes also discusses his new book “26.2 Stories of Blisters & Bliss.”

  • 00:09:00 Ben Duncan

    Expert jungle guide Ben Duncan leads Boyd through the Borneo jungle in search of orangutans. While Duncan helps Boyd spot the great ape, they end up finding many more leeches.

  • 00:06:00 Jeff Enlow

    National Geographic Young Explorer and photographer Jeff Enlow documents changes in the California Delta. Enlow captures the mixture of saltwater and freshwater, nature and industrialization in his photos. The impact on farmers and all who buy from them will be affected with the “move” of this river.

  • 00:08:00 Terry Garcia

    Terry Garcia, Executive Vice President of Mission Programs at National Geographic, joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the work National Geographic does to support scientists and explorers in the field. Garcia talks to Boyd about the eccentric and passionate people he meets every day. Garcia is departing National Geographic to serve as Deputy Secretary of Commerce.

  • Boyd shares stories of his July 4th celebration in Telluride, Colorado, participating in the annual parade and joining a group called “Men Without Rhythm.” Surfing his way to a cheeseburger paradise, Boyd gets a tattoo of Tinker-Bell as a souvenir.