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Episode 1133—Air Date: August 13, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about adopting orphaned elephants, ultra-light camping gear for your next adventure, the color of dinosaurs, fish using tools, flying high over Los Angeles in a weather balloon, the future of robotics, deformed frogs, the Eurovision contest, and Stingray City.

HOUR 1

• National Geographic photographer Nick Nichols has crisscrossed the globe on many photography assignments in his 30 years working with National Geographic magazine. Nichols shares his latest adventure of visiting an elephant orphanage and talks about what he sees for himself in the near future.

Steve Casimiro, the “gear guru,” shows Boyd the latest in outdoor technology for lightweight camping. From ultra-light sleeping bags to super-soft windbreakers, Casimiro describes the best ways to keep warm and dry out on the trails.

• Over the years, much has been learned about dinosaurs through extensive paleontology. However, their true colors still remain a mystery. Boyd joins paleontologist and National Geographic grantee Phillip Manning who is attempting to unlock the secrets to the actual colors of dinosaur skin. He shares that he may be on the verge of a breakthrough.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd about some wonders of the water, including pea-soup oceans and fish using tools.

HOUR 2

Colin Rich, creator of Pacific Star, tells Boyd about his fun YouTube balloon experiment that turned into a scientific undertaking that reached new heights. Rich shares the experience of flying his weather balloons far and wide to gather photos to be used in scientific research.

• One day, will robots be able to become just another face in the crowd? Chris Carroll, author of “Us. And them.” in the August issue of National Geographic magazine, shares his insights on the future of robotics and the unsettling effects that lifelike robots have on their human counterparts.

• The word “mutant” is often associated with superheroes, but there’s nothing super about mutations in nature. Pieter Johnson, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado and a National Geographic grantee, studies the effects of mutations on frogs. Johnson talks about the parasite that causes these mutations and the effect they have upon the frog’s existence.

• For most Americans, singing competition shows are a great way to entertain themselves on a Tuesday night. For the country of Azerbaijan, it’s a ticket for the nation to be represented on the world stage. National Geographic Young Explorer grantee Amanda Rivkin tells Boyd about how this country has sunk millions of dollars into the goal of getting one of its own to win the Eurovision singing competition.

Boyd talks about the experience of taking a group of 15 young essay winners to the Cayman Islands, including the excitement of swimming with stingrays in the wild.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1133—Air Date: August 13, 2011

  • National Geographic photographer Nick Nichols has crisscrossed the globe on many photography assignments in his 30 years working with National Geographic magazine. Nichols shares his latest adventure of visiting an elephant orphanage and talks about what he sees for himself in the near future.

  • 00:06:00 Steve Casimiro

    Steve Casimiro, the “gear guru,” shows Boyd the latest in outdoor technology for lightweight camping. From ultra-light sleeping bags to super-soft windbreakers, Casimiro describes the best ways to keep warm and dry out on the trails.

  • 00:08:00 Phillip Manning

    Over the years, much has been learned about dinosaurs through extensive paleontology. However, their true colors still remain a mystery. Boyd joins paleontologist and National Geographic grantee Phillip Manning who is attempting to unlock the secrets to the actual colors of dinosaur skin. He shares that he may be on the verge of a breakthrough.

  • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd about some wonders of the water, including pea-soup oceans and fish using tools.

  • 00:11:00 Colin Rich

    Colin Rich, creator of Pacific Star, tells Boyd about his fun YouTube balloon experiment that turned into a scientific undertaking that reached new heights. Rich shares the experience of flying his weather balloons far and wide to gather photos to be used in scientific research.

  • 00:09:00 Chris Carroll

    One day, will robots be able to become just another face in the crowd? Chris Carroll, author of “Us. And them.” in the August issue of National Geographic magazine, shares his insights on the future of robotics and the unsettling effects that lifelike robots have on their human counterparts.

  • 00:06:00 Pieter Johnson

    The word “mutant” is often associated with superheroes, but there’s nothing super about mutations in nature. Pieter Johnson, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado and a National Geographic grantee, studies the effects of mutations on frogs. Johnson talks about the parasite that causes these mutations and the effect they have upon the frog’s existence.

  • 00:08:00 Amanda Rivkin

    For most Americans, singing competition shows are a great way to entertain ourselves on a Tuesday night. For the country of Azerbaijan, it’s a ticket for the nation to be represented on the world stage. National Geographic Young Explorer grantee Amanda Rivkin tells Boyd about how this country has sunk millions of dollars into the goal of getting one of its own to win the Eurovision singing competition.

  • Boyd talks about the experience of taking a group of 15 young essay winners to the Cayman Islands, including the excitement of swimming with stingrays in the wild.