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Episode 1140—Air Date: October 1, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about the green Sahara, taking photos with Henry Rollins, Superman and the KKK, gold from the sky, Barbary pirates, submarines, bubble netting with humpback whales, a new human ancestor, and doing your own thing when traveling together.

HOUR 1

• National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno is usually digging up dinosaur bones. But in 2000, Sereno was walking through the Sahara in northern Niger when he found a nearly 10,000-year-old human skull. Sereno joins Boyd in the studio with the skull to talk about the human fossils he’s uncovered and the green Sahara that was their home. Read more in the article "Green Sahara" in the October 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine.

• Musician, spoken word artist, and Nat Geo Channel host Henry Rollins often travels to some of the toughest corners of the world. In his new book Occupants, Rollins reflects on his travels with photographs and words. Rollins, who will speak about his work at a National Geographic Live event on Oct. 7, joins Boyd to give him a sneak peak of the upcoming show.

• In his new book Superman vs. the Ku Klux Klan: The True Story of How the Iconic Superhero Battled the Men of Hate, Rick Bowers explains how KKK infiltrators actually fed information to writers of the Superman comic book and radio program. Bowers joins Boyd to talk about Superman’s fight for justice.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about gold from outer space.

HOUR 2

• Pirates have been in the news a lot lately. But pirates have been plying the waters off Africa for centuries, says Adrian Tinniswood, author of Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean. Tinniswood joins Boyd to talk about outlaws on the high seas, past and present.

• Pirates aren’t the only danger for ships at sea. Submarines lurk beneath the waves waiting to strike. In his new book Silent Killers: Submarines and Underwater Warfare, James Delgado looks back at the submarine’s role in the history of naval warfare.

Fred Sharpe has spent the past 16 years studying humpback whales in southeast Alaska. Sharpe joins Boyd to talk about using National Geographic’s Crittercam to study humpback whale behavior. The cameras help Sharpe and his colleagues understand how the whales use bubbles to catch fish.

Josh Fischman’s article “Part Ape, Part Human,” in the August 2011 National Geographic magazine, takes a close look at possibly the richest collection of fossil skeletons ever found. Fischman tells Boyd about the work National Geographic grantee Lee Berger is doing to uncover a new human ancestor in South Africa.

Boyd says he and his wife have different styles of travel, but they find ways to enjoy their vacations, together and apart.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1140—Air Date: October 1, 2011

  • 00:08:00 Josh Fischman

    Josh Fischman’s article “Part Ape, Part Human,” in the August 2011 National Geographic magazine, takes a close look at possibly the richest collection of fossil skeletons ever found. Fischman tells Boyd about the work National Geographic grantee Lee Berger is doing to uncover a new human ancestor in South Africa.

  • 00:09:00 James Delgado

    Pirates aren’t the only danger for ships at sea. Submarines lurk beneath the waves waiting to strike. In his new book Silent Killers: Submarines and Underwater WarfareJames Delgado looks back at the submarine’s role in the history of naval warfare.

  • Pirates have been in the news a lot lately. But pirates have been plying the waters off Africa for centuries, says Adrian Tinniswood, author of Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean. Tinniswood joins Boyd to talk about outlaws on the high seas, past and present.

  • 00:06:00 Fred Sharpe

    Fred Sharpe has spent the past 16 years studying humpback whales in southeast Alaska. Sharpe joins Boyd to talk about using National Geographic’s Crittercam to study humpback whale behavior. The cameras help Sharpe and his colleagues understand how the whales use bubbles to catch fish.

  • Boyd says he and his wife have different styles of travel, but they find ways to enjoy their vacations, together and apart.

    • 00:09:00 Henry Rollins

      Musician, spoken word artist, and Nat Geo Channel host Henry Rollins often travels to some of the toughest corners of the world. In his new book Occupants, Rollins reflects on his travels with photographs and words. Rollins, who will speak about his work at a National Geographic Live event on Oct. 7, joins Boyd to give him a sneak peak of the upcoming show.

    • 00:11:00 Paul Sereno

      National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno is usually digging up dinosaur bones. But in 2000, Sereno was walking through the Sahara in northern Niger when he found a nearly 10,000-year-old human skull. Sereno joins Boyd in the studio with the skull to talk about the human fossils he’s uncovered and the green Sahara that was their home. Read more in the article "Green Sahara" in the October 2011 issue of National Geographic.

    • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about gold from outer space.

      • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about gold from outer space.

        • 00:08:00 Rick Bowers

          In his new book Superman vs. the Ku Klux Klan: The True Story of How the Iconic Superhero Battled the Men of HateRick Bowers explains how KKK infiltrators actually fed information to writers of the Superman comic book and radio program. Bowers joins Boyd to talk about Superman’s fight for justice.