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Episode 1143—Air Date: October 22, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about finding shipwrecks in the Mediterranean, unraveling the mysteries of the teenage brain, feeding hungry owls, the urban cowboys of Ulaanbaatar, sniffing out how the nose knows, descending into Australia’s slot canyons, animals behaving badly, licking the problem of endangered species, building a house to stave off a mid-life crisis, and playing with a baby rhinoceros.

HOUR 1

• Boyd heads out of the studio to join National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Bob Ballard aboard his vessel the E/V Nautilus. Currently in Turkey, Ballard tells Boyd about the many shipwrecks he is finding in the Mediterranean. You can follow Ballard and his team live as they explore the ocean at www.nautiluslive.org.

• Why do teenagers act the way they do? David Dobbs looks into this question in National Geographic magazine’s October cover story “Teenage Brains.” Dobbs explains to Boyd some of the ways teenage brains differ from adult brains.

• Cats may keep mice and rats at bay, but so can owls. In 2002, Alex Godbe founded the Hungry Owl Project in order to educate people about the dangers of pesticides. Godbe tells Boyd about the project that installs owl boxes, which are essentially big birdhouses, in parks, ranches, golf courses, vineyards, and any place where gophers or rats are a problem.

• Thousands of nomads in Mongolia are ending their wandering ways and settling down in the big city of Ulaanbaatar. Don Belt writes about the influx of herders into the city in the October National Geographic magazine article “The Urban Clan of Genghis Khan.”

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about how the nose knows.

HOUR 2

• Exploring Australia’s slot canyons in the Blue Mountains means braving poisonous snakes, mouse-size spiders and possible flash floods. But those willing to brave these dangers are rewarded with beautiful waterfalls and unexplored canyons, says Mark Jenkins, author of the October 2011 National Geographic magazine article “Deep Down Under.”

• Animals aren’t all cute and cuddly. Take for example killer cows, dogs with guns, and baboon bandits. Linda Lombardi, author of Animals Behaving Badly: Boozing Bees, Cheating Chimps, Dogs with Guns, and Other Beastly True Tales, tells Boyd about animals that have turned on people and each other. There are more tales of animal woe on Lombardi’s blog.

• The U.S. Postal Service and the World Wildlife Fund are working to stamp out extinction with the Save the Vanishing Species postage stamp. Ginette Hemley, senior vice president of conservation strategy at WWF, says for 55 cents you can buy one of these special stamps and help lick the problem of endangered species.

• Mid-life crises often result in new sports cars or career changes. But building a house was Lou Ureneck’s way of finding new meaning in his life. Ureneck chronicles his experience in the book Cabin: Two Brothers, a Dream and Five Acres in Maine, and he shares with Boyd what the adventure taught him.

Boyd talks about the growing problem of rhinoceros poaching.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1143—Air Date: October 22, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Bob Ballard

    Boyd heads out of the studio to join National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Bob Ballard aboard his vessel the E/V Nautilus. Currently in Turkey, Ballard tells Boyd about the many shipwrecks he is finding in the Mediterranean. You can follow Ballard and his team, live as they explore the ocean at www.nautiluslive.org.

  • 00:09:00 David Dobbs

    Why do teenagers act the way they do? David Dobbs looks into this question in National Geographic magazine’s October cover story “Teenage Brains.” Dobbs explains to Boyd some of the ways teenage brains differ from adult brains.

  • 00:06:00 Alex Godbe

    Cats may keep mice and rats at bay, but so can owls. In 2002, Alex Godbe founded the Hungry Owl Project in order to educate people about the dangers of pesticides. Godbe tells Boyd about the project that installs owl boxes, which are essentially big birdhouses, in parks, ranches, golf courses, vineyards and any place where gophers or rats are a problem.

    • 00:08:00 Don Belt

      Thousands of nomads in Mongolia are ending their wandering ways and settling down in the big city of Ulaanbaatar. Don Belt writes about the influx of herders into the city in the October National Geographic magazine article “The Urban Clan of Genghis Khan.”

    • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about how the nose knows.

      • 00:11:00 Mark Jenkins

        Exploring Australia’s slot canyons in the Blue Mountains means braving poisonous snakes, mouse-size spiders and possible flash floods. But those willing to brave these dangers are rewarded with beautiful waterfalls and unexplored canyons, says Mark Jenkins, author of the October 2011 National Geographic magazine article “Deep Down Under.”

      • 00:09:00 Linda Lombardi

        Animals aren’t all cute and cuddly, take for example killer cows, dogs with guns, and baboon bandits. Linda Lombardi, author of Animals Behaving Badly: Boozing Bees, Cheating Chimps, Dogs with Guns, and Other Beastly True Tales, tells Boyd about animals who have turned on people and each other. There are more tails of animal woe on Lombardi’s blog.

      • 00:06:00 Ginette Hemley

        The U.S. Postal Service and the World Wildlife Fund are working to stamp out extinction with the Save the Vanishing Species postage stamp. Ginette Hemley, the Senior Vice President of Conservation Strategy at WWF, says for 55 cents you can buy one of these special stamps and help lick the problem of endangered species.

      • 00:08:00 Lou Ureneck

        Mid-life crises often result in new sports cars or career changes. But building a house was Lou Ureneck’s way of finding new meaning in his life. Ureneck chronicles his experience in the book Cabin: Two Brothers, a Dream and Five Acres in Maine, and he shares with Boyd what the adventure taught him.

      • Boyd talks about the growing problem of rhinoceros poaching.