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Episode 1149—Air Date: December 3, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about skiing extreme slopes in South America, saving the African grey parrot, spotting a snow leopard, looking for new species in the Caribbean, teaching photography in Bangladesh, going on assignment for National Geographic in Borneo, licking frogs, searching for sunken treasure in the Mediterranean, and a behind-the-scenes look at the Cuban revolution.

HOUR 1

• A 2012 National Geographic Adventurers of the Year nominee, Nick Wagoner is a skier and a filmmaker. His ski film Solitaire is an odyssey through South America, from the Amazon to Patagonia. The movie was shot on foot, horseback, riverboat, skies, and paragliders over the course of two years.

• African parrots are very smart and very popular as pets. But their popularity is killing them. Three million wild-caught African parrots have been officially traded over the past 25 years, and the actual numbers are likely much higher. As director of the World Parrot Trust, National Geographic grantee Steve Boyes is working to save the parrots from extinction.

• Snow leopards are under threat, says Erik Wikramanayake, a senior conservation scientist at the World Wildlife Fund. Studying and counting this elusive cat is very difficult. It’s estimated there are fewer than 7,000 snow leopards in the wild, but Wikramanayake says some snow leopard populations are rebounding.

Smithsonian biologist Carole Baldwin is looking for new fish species off the island of Curacao in the southern Caribbean. By using a submarine to go deeper than scuba divers can, she has been able to identify many critters heretofore unknown to science.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about weird and wild news found on the National Geographic website.

HOUR 2

• Photographer Shahidul Alam is president of the Bangladesh Photographic Society. Alam joins Boyd to talk about his activism, his teaching, and his new book My Journey as a Witness.

• National Geographic photographer Mattias Klum tells Boyd about the time he was working in Borneo and the king of Sweden dropped by to watch him. It paid off when the king delivered white wine to Klum in the middle of the jungle.

• National Geographic grantee Valerie Clark licks frogs for a living. As Clark tells Boyd, she’s not looking for Prince Charming. Instead, she is studying how the diet of frogs in Madagascar relates to the toxicity of their skin.

Craig Mullen is the director and co-founder of the Aurora Trust, an organization founded to explore the ocean floor for shipwrecks. Mullen joins producer Ben Shaw to talk about recent discoveries, including an Etruscan ship from the 8th century B.C.

Boyd tells a story from behind the Cuban revolution that was shared with him on a recent trip there.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1149—Air Date: December 3, 2011

  • 00:08:00 Carole Baldwin

    Smithsonian biologist Carole Baldwin is looking for new fish species off the island of Curacao in the southern Caribbean. By using a submarine to go deeper than scuba divers can, she has been able to identify many critters yet unknown to science.

  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about weird and wild news found on the National Geographic website.

    • 00:11:00 Nick Wagoner

      One of the 2012 National Geographic Adventurers of the Year nominee, Nick Wagoner is a skier and a filmmaker. His ski film “Solitaire” is an odyssey through South America, from the Amazon to Patagonia. The movie was shot on foot, horseback, riverboat, skies and paragliders over the course of two years.

      • 00:09:00 Steve Boyes

        African parrots are very smart and very popular as pets. But their popularity is killing them. Three million wild-caught African parrots have been officially traded over the past 25 years, and the actual numbers are likely much higher. As director of the World Parrot Trust, National Geographic grantee Steve Boyes is working to save the parrots from extinction.

      • Snow leopards are under threat, says Erik Wikramanayake, a senior conservation scientist at the World Wildlife Fund. Studying and counting this elusive cat is very difficult, but it’s estimated there are fewer than 7,000 snow leopards in the wild. But Wikramanayake says some snow leopard populations are rebounding.

      • 00:11:00 Shahidul Alam

        Photographer Shahidul Alam is president of the Bangladesh Photographic Society. Alam joins Boyd to talk about his activism, his teaching and his new book “My Journey as a Witness.”

      • 00:09:00 Mattias Klum

        National Geographic photographer Mattias Klum tells Boyd about the time he was working in Borneo and the king of Sweden dropped by to watch him. It paid off when the king delivered white wine to Klum in the middle of the jungle.

      • 00:06:00 Valerie Clark

        National Geographic grantee Valerie Clark licks frogs for a living. As Clark tells Boyd, she’s not looking for Prince Charming. Instead, she is studying how the diet of frogs in Madagascar relates to the toxicity of their skin.

        • 00:08:00 Craig Mullen

          Craig Mullen is the director and co-founder of the Aurora Trust, an organization founded to explore the ocean floor for shipwrecks. Mullen joins producer Ben Shaw to talk about recent discoveries, including an Etruscan ship from the 8th century B.C.

        • Boyd tells a story from behind the revolution that was shared with him on a recent trip to Cuba.