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Episode 1202—Air Date: January 8, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about the landmines in Cambodia, thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail in record time, northern Montana homesteaders, New-Year diet tips, wasp facial recognition, biking the length of the Silk Road, digging up thousands of animal bones in Colorado, climbing the world’s tallest peaks, and National Geographic’s 10,000-grant milestone.

HOUR 1

• During nearly 30 years of warfare in Cambodia, landmines were regularly used by all sides to thin out the enemy’s ranks. Over 10 years later, the country is still rife with landmines. Mark Jenkins, author of “The Healing Fields ” in the January 2012 National Geographic magazine tells Boyd about his time in the country with de-mining workers.

• Thru-hiker Jennifer Pharr Davis set an Appalachian Trail record by walking for up to 16 hours a day and “healing as (she) hiked.” Davis credits her achievement to working smarter than her competitors and a bit of tough love from her husband. She is one of National Geographic’s Adventurers of the Year for 2012.

• Northern Montana’s Hi-Line region was settled by homesteaders promised free land by the government. They didn’t realize that the region is so inhospitable that for many years, they wouldn't make any profit. Bill Allard, who photographed the region for “Riding Out Another Season” in the January 2012 National Geographic magazine talks with Boyd about the difficulties of Hi-Line life.

• Another year, another broken New Year’s resolution. Boyd talks with National Geographic Fellow Barton Seaver about ways to make our promises more sustainable—both for us and for the planet.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News , joins Boyd to talk about wasps that recognize each other’s faces and whale bones in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

HOUR 2

• Cyclist Kate Harris rode 6,000 miles of the Silk Road from Turkey to India and passed through 10 countries along the way. Harris’ project focused on the wildernesses that surround international borders. Harris talks with Boyd about the difficulty of eating thousands of packs of instant noodles.

• Paleobotanist Dr. Kirk Johnson had 70 days to dig up as many fossils as possible in Snowmass Village, Colorado, before the town began construction on a new reservoir. Johnson tells Boyd about the mastodons, camels, bison, beavers, and otters that he found on the dig.

• In his new book Mountain Heroes: Portraits of Adventure, British historian Huw Lewis-Jones shares stories about his mountaineering heroes. Lewis-Jones tells Boyd that he doesn’t necessarily admire those who climb the tallest peaks, but those who embody “the climbing spirit.”

• Since 1888, National Geographic Society has been providing grants to scientists, adventurers, and explorers in order to further our understanding of the world. In 2011, the Society gave its 10,000th grant. Vice President for Research, Conservation, and Exploration John Francis joins Boyd to discuss the significance of the milestone, and the pair plan their own grant application.

Boyd reflects on his nearly five years working with outgoing producer Ben Shaw and wishes him the best on his own adventures.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1202—Air Date: January 8, 2012

  • 10:59 Mark Jenkins

    During nearly 30 years of warfare in Cambodia, landmines were a regularly used by all sides to thin out the enemy’s ranks. Over 10 years later, the country is still rife with landmines. Mark Jenkins, author of “The Healing Fields” in the January National Geographic magazine tells Boyd about his time in the country with de-mining workers.

  • Thru-hiker Jennifer Pharr Davis set an Appalachian Trail record by walking for up to 16 hours a day and “healing as (she) hiked.” Davis credits her achievement to working smarter than her competitors and a bit of tough love from her husband. She is one of National Geographic’s Adventurers of the Year for 2012.

  • 00:06:00 Bill Allard

    Northern Montana’s Hi-Line region was settled by homesteaders promised free land by the government who didn’t realize that the region is so inhospitable that many years, they didn’t make any profit. Bill Allard, who photographed the region for January’s National Geographic magazine story “Riding Out Another Season,” talks with Boyd about the difficulties of Hi-Line life.

  • 00:08:00 Barton Seaver

    Another year, another broken New Year’s resolution. Boyd talks with National Geographic Fellow Barton Seaver about ways to make our promises more sustainable – both for us and for the planet.

  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about wasps that recognize each other’s faces and whale bones in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

  • 00:11:00 Kate Harris

    Cyclist Kate Harris rode 6,000 miles of the Silk Road from Turkey to India and passed through 10 countries along the way. Harris’ project focused on the wildernesses that surround international borders and the disruptive effect of the man-made divisions. Harris talks with Boyd about the adventure and the difficulty of eating thousands of packs of instant noodles.

  • 00:09:00 Dr. Kirk Johnson

    Paleobotanist Dr. Kirk Johnson had 70 days to dig up as many fossils as possible in Snowmass Village, Colorado before the town began construction on a new reservoir. Dr. Johnson tells Boyd about the mastodons, camels, bison, beavers and otters that he found on the dig.

  • 00:06:00 Huw Lewis-Jones

    In his new book “Mountain Heroes: Portraits of Adventure,” British historian Huw Lewis-Jones shares stories about his mountaineering heroes. Lewis-Jones tells Boyd that he doesn’t necessarily admire those who climb the tallest peaks, but those who remain humble despite their fame.

  • 00:08:00 John Francis

    Since 1888, National Geographic Society has been providing scientists, adventurers and explorers grants in order to further our understanding of the world in which we live. In 2011, the Society gave its 10,000th grant. Vice President for Research, Conservation, and Exploration John Francis joins Boyd to discuss the significance of the milestone, and the pair plan their own grant application.

  • 00:03:50 Boyd Matson

    Boyd reflects on his nearly 5 years working with outgoing producer Ben Shaw and wishes him the best on his own adventures.