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Episode 1204—Air Date: January 22, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about being charged by black rhinos in Zimbabwe, making a toaster from scratch, a golden discovery in Panama, what petrified tree rings have to do with Genghis Khan, dining with leopard seals in Antarctica, what twins can teach us about genetics, 2011’s tornado record, and how to quench the thirst of an entire nation.

HOUR 1

• Boyd goes On The Road to Zimbabwe to visit the rock art of the San Bush people. Guide Brad Fouché tells about the history of San artists, whose animal depictions have lived on the rock faces for centuries. They also relive an experience in which they ended up face-to-face with a rhino.

• Many household objects seem simple—but if you think about where all of the plastics and metals come from, a toaster goes from a minor convenience to a near miracle. In his Toaster Project, Thomas Thwaites attempts to mine the copper and iron required to create a toaster from scratch.

• On a dig in Panama, an archeologist discovered a burial site filled with gold. It is deep enough that it has survived for centuries without grave robbers—or Spanish Conquistadores—from looting it. Ann Williams chats with Boyd about her article in the January 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine.

• While studying petrified trees in Mongolia, Amy Hessl made an interesting discovery. It was once thought that Genghis Khan led his Mongolian army across the steppes and into Europe as a result of drought at home. Hessl’s discovery tells us the exact opposite.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss the “yeti” crab.

HOUR 2

• Recently returned from his trip to Antarctica, National Geographic’s Vice President of Remote Imaging Greg Marshall returns with stories of gory meals shared with leopard seals and airplane crashes.

• Twins allow geneticists to fill a knowledge gap in the nature-versus-nurture debates. In the January 2012 cover story, "Twins" of National Geographic magazine, Peter Miller tells Boyd just how similar twins can be, even when raised hundreds of miles apart.

Dr. Jeff Masters, head meteorologist at The Weather Underground, explains to Boyd how stormy April 2011 was and how devastating the month would have been if it had been 50 years earlier.

• Sudan’s Darfur region is one of the world’s most dangerous. That’s why former bartender Doc Hendley targeted the area to work as a water crusader. Fixing wells—the work of his organization Wine to Water— has brought him directly in the line of fire. He tells Boyd about his new book as well.

• In the weekly Wild Chronicles segment Boyd shares his experience testing just how well rhinoceros see.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1204—Air Date: January 22, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Brad Fouche

    Boyd goes On The Road to Zimbabwe to visit the rock art of the San Bush people. Guide Brad Fouché tells about the history of San artists, whose animal depictions have lived on the rock faces for centuries. They also relive an experience in which they ended up face-to-face with a rhino.

  • 00:09:00 Thomas Thwaites

    Many household objects seem simple – but if you think about where all of the plastics and metals come from, a toaster goes from a minor convenience to a near miracle. In his Toaster Project, Thomas Thwaites attempts to mine the copper and iron required to create a toaster from scratch.

  • 00:06:00 Ann Williams

    On a dig in Panama, an archeologist discovered a burial site filled with gold. It is deep enough that it has survived for centuries without grave robbers – or Spanish Conquistadores – from looting it. Ann Williams chats with Boyd about her article in the January issue of the magazine.

  • 00:08:00 Amy Hessl

    While studying petrified trees in Mongolia, Amy Hessl made an interesting discovery. It was once thought that Genghis Khan led his Mongolian army across the steppes and into Europe as a result of drought at home. Hessl’s discovery tells us the exact opposite.

  • 00:03:50 Yeti Crab

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss the “yeti” crab.

  • 00:11:00 Greg Marshall

    Recently returned from his trip to Antarctica, National Geographic’s Vice President of Remote Imaging Greg Marshall returns with stories of gory meals shared with leopard seals and airplane crashes.

  • 00:09:00 Peter Miller

    Twins allow geneticists to fill a knowledge gap in the nature-versus-nurture debates. In January’s cover story in National Geographic magazine, Peter Miller tells Boyd just how similar twins can be, even when raised hundreds of miles apart.

  • 00:06:00 Jeff Masters

    Dr. Jeff Masters, head meteorologist at The Weather Underground, explains to Boyd how stormy April 2011 was and how devastating the month would have been if it had been 50 years earlier.

  • 00:08:00 Doc Hendley

    Sudan’s Darfur region is one of the world’s most dangerous. That’s why former bartender Doc Hendley targeted the area to work as a water crusader. His organization, Wine to Water’s work fixing wells has brought him directly in the line of fire. He tells Boyd about his new book as well.

  • 00:03:50 Rhino Vision

    In the weekly Wild Chronicles segment Boyd shares his experience testing just how well rhinoceros see.