Archives

Episode 1205—Air Date: January 29, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about walking 3,000 miles across Western Canada, helping blind monkeys see, solving America’s energy crisis, harvesting sewers for water, testing lions and rhinos to see just how close they can get, visiting a lone wolf in California, sailing through 60-knot winds, and stopping the ivory black market in Kenya.

HOUR 1

• If a remote wilderness is destroyed but nobody is there to see it, is it really happening? National Geographic Explorer in Residence, Mike Fay gives a voice to Western Canada’s wilderness as gold mines and oil sands threaten to destroy it. He plans to walk 3,000 miles over the span of 2 years. He tells Boyd that he’ll hunt squirrel and fish to supplement his diet.

• Losing a primary sense can be devastating. But what if lost vision could be restored? Dr. Sheila Nirenberg thinks she has the ability to cure certain types of blindness by developing an artificial eye that uses a camera to replace a damaged retina.

• Not long ago, people across the country thought hydrofracking for natural gas could be a solution for developing sustainable energy in the United States. But there were unintended consequences: earthquakes. National Geographic Digital Media Energy Editor, Marianne Lavelle, says that the real issue is how the toxic water is disposed of.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss Australia's decision to mine their sewers for water.

HOUR 2

• In the latest edition of our On The Road segment, Boyd chats with James Crooks at the Singita Lebombo Lodge in South Africa. Crooks takes Boyd into the bush to get as close as possible to lions and rhinos without getting charged.

• An old Russian proverb says: “A wolf lives by its feet.” Former U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s wolf recovery coordinator, Ed Bangs, knows that’s true. He draws upon his expertise to explain why a wolf recently made Northern California his home—the first to do so in 80 years. Bangs explains: he’s looking for love.

David Rockefeller, grandson of oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, has spent much of his life sailing around the world. As he aged, he noticed the water quality deteriorating and wanted to do something about it. He tells Boyd about his charity, Sailors for the Sea.

• 2011 was one of the worst years on record for elephant and rhino poaching. A huge demand from China has driven up the price of ivory and rhino horn to astronomical prices—money that many Africans simply cannot resist. Emerging Explorer Paula Kahumbu provides an update from the ground in Kenya.

• In the weekly Wild Chronicles segment Boyd reflects on winter’s recent arrival to the Washington, D.C. area—and how balmy it is compared to diving in Antarctica.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1205—Air Date: January 29, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Mike Fay

    If a remote wilderness is destroyed but nobody is there to see it, is it really happening? National Geographic Explorer in Residence, Mike Fay give a voice to Western Canada’s wilderness as gold mines and oil sands threaten to destroy it. He plans to walk 3,000 miles over the span of 2 years. He tells Boyd that he’ll hunt squirrel and fish to supplement his diet.

  • 00:09:00 Mike Fay

    If a remote wilderness is destroyed but nobody is there to see it, is it really happening? National Geographic Explorer in ResidenceMike Fay give a voice to Western Canada’s wilderness as gold mines and oil sands threaten to destroy it. He plans to walk 3,000 miles over the span of 2 years. He tells Boyd that he’ll hunt squirrel and fish to supplement his diet.

  • 00:06:00 Sheila Nirenberg

    Losing a primary sense can be devastating. But what if lost vision could be restored? Dr. Sheila Nirenberg thinks she has the ability to cure certain types of blindness by developing an artificial eye that uses a camera to replace a damaged retina.

  • 00:08:00 Marianne Lavelle

    Not long ago, people across the country thought hydrofracking for natural gas could be an answer to develop sustainable energy in the United States. But there were unintended consequences: earthquakes. National Geographic Digital Media Energy Editor, Marianne Lavelle, says that the real issue is how the toxic water is disposed of.

  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss Australia decision to mine their sewers for water.

  • 00:11:00 James Crooks

    In the latest edition of our On The Road segment, Boyd chats with James Crooks at the Singita Lebombo Lodge in South Africa. Crooks takes Boyd into the bush to get as close as possible to lions and rhinos without getting charged.

  • 00:09:00 Ed Bangs

    An old Russian proverb says: “A wolf lives by its feet.” Former U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s wolf recovery coordinator,Ed Bangs, knows that’s true. He draws upon his expertise to explain why a wolf recently made Northern California his home – the first to do so in 80 years. Bangs explains: he’s looking for love.

  • David Rockefeller, grandson of oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, has spent much of his life sailing around the world. As he aged, he noticed the water quality deteriorating and wanted to do something about it. He tells Boyd about his charity, Sailors for the Sea.

  • 00:08:00 Kahumbu Ivory

    2011 was one of the worst years on record for elephant and rhino poaching. A huge demand from China has driven up the price of ivory and rhino horn to astronomical prices – money that many Africans simply cannot resist. Emerging Explorer Paula Kahumbu provides an update from the ground in Kenya.

  • 00:03:50 Antarctic Diving

    In the weekly Wild Chronicles segment Boyd reflects on winter’s recent arrival to the Washington, D.C. area – and how balmy it is compared to diving in Antarctica.