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Episode 1210—Air Date: March 4, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about flying off mountaintops and trying to land without a parachute, reliving Japan’s 2011 tsunami, protecting Egypt and Libya’s priceless museum artifacts from looters, riding across Alaska behind a team of dogs, fighting it out for pack dominance with Ethiopia’s geladas, rediscovering a forgotten work of art by one of the world’s masters, and preparing Seattle for natural disaster.

HOUR 1

Dean Potter is the mellowest adrenaline junkie out there. The soft-spoken, free soloing, line walking, base jumping 2009 Adventurer of the Year has perfected sky flying, and appears in a recent National Geographic TV show, The Man Who Can Fly. He tells Boyd about his experiences flying off British Columbia’s Mt. Bute.

• After Japan was devastated by earthquakes and tsunamis in February, 2010, Oscar nominated documentarian Lucy Walker saw a parallel between the country’s rebuild and its delicate cherry blossoms. In the National Geographic supported film, The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, she examines the nation’s emotional recovery.

• Irreplaceable historical artifacts can command a lot of money. There is a thriving market for items plucked from museums in countries steeped in history that have recently been experiencing political and financial upheavals like Egypt, Libya and Greece. National Geographic Fellow Fred Hiebert has helped track artifacts and try to prevent the illicit sales.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss the naming habits of parents with highly successful children.

HOUR 2

• Chicago-born Hugh Neff crossed the finish line of the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest dog sled race a mere 23 seconds ahead of second place finisher on the strength of lead dog Walter Payton’s experience. Neff, who hopes to win the Iditarod just 2 weeks after the Yukon race finished, promised Boyd, “the best is yet to come.”

• Geladas, baboon-like monkeys that live in Ethiopia, have violent wars that often leave the losers seriously injured or dead. National Geographic Young Explorer Shayna Lieberman caught one such takeover on tape and lived to tell Boyd the story.

• When you have a good eye for fine art - and the financial clout to back it up—it’s possible to make a huge profit. Tom O’Neill tells the story in the February 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine of one investor who purchased what he thought was a Leonardo DaVinci original and may have made hundreds of millions of dollars because of it.

Tim Folger has a warning for the Pacific Northwest—learn from Japan’s natural disasters. In his article "Tsunami Science" in the February 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine, he explains how a tsunami roaring over America’s West Coast is inevitable.

• In his regular Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd shares the story of his first ever sky diving experience, and met a person who had never been in an airplane before, but had decided they were going to jump out of one.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1210—Air Date: March 4, 2012

  • Dean Potter is the mellowest adrenaline junkie out there. The soft-spoken free soloing, line walking, base jumping 2009 Adventurer of the Year has perfected sky flying, and appears in a recent National Geographic TV show, The Man Who Can Fly. He tells Boyd about his experiences flying off British Columbia’s Mt. Bute.

  • Dean Potter is the mellowest adrenaline junkie out there. The soft-spoken free soloing, line walking, base jumping 2009 Adventurer of the Year has perfected sky flying, and appears in a recent National Geographic TV show, The Man Who Can Fly. He tells Boyd about his experiences flying off British Columbia’s Mt. Bute.

  • 00:06:00 Lucy Walker

    After Japan was devastated by earthquakes and tsunamis in February, 2010, Oscar nominated documentarianLucy Walker saw a parallel between the country’s rebuild and its delicate cherry blossoms. In the National Geographic supported film, “The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom,” she examines the nation’s emotional recovery.

  • 00:08:00 Fred Heibert

    Irreplaceable historical artifacts can command a lot of money. There is a thriving market for items plucked from museums in countries steeped in history that have recently been experiencing political and financial upheavals like Egypt, Libya and Greece. National Geographic Fellow Fred Hiebert has helped track artifacts and try to prevent the illicit sales.

  • 00:03:50 News - March 4

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss the naming habits of parents with highly successful children.

  • 00:11:00 Hugh Neff

    Chicago-born Hugh Neff crossed the finish line of the 1,000 mile Yukon Quest dog sled race a mere 23 seconds ahead of second place finisher on the strength of lead dog Walter Payton’s experience. Neff, who hopes to win the Iditarod just 2 weeks after the Yukon race finished, promised Boyd, “the best is yet to come.”

  • 00:09:00 Shayna Lieberman

    Geladas, baboon-like monkeys that live in Ethiopia, have violent wars that often leave the losers seriously injured or dead. National Geographic Young Explorer Shayna Lieberman caught one such takeover on tape and lived to tell Boyd the story.

  • 00:06:00 Tom O'Neill

    When you have a good eye for fine art - and the financial clout to back it up – it’s possible to make a huge profit. Tom O’Neill tells the story in the February issue of National Geographic Magazine of one investor who purchased what he thought was a Leonardo DaVinci original and may have made hundreds of millions of dollars because of it.

  • 00:08:00 Tim Folger

    Tim Folger has a warning for the Pacific Northwest – learn from Japan’s natural disasters. In the February issue of National Geographic magazine, he explains how a tsunami roaring over America’s West Coast is inevitable.

  • In his regular Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd shares the story of his first ever sky diving experience, and met a person who had never been in an airplane before, but had decided they were going to jump out of one.