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Episode 1214—Air Date: April 1, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about getting body-slammed by a leopard seal, quenching the world's thirst, diving to the bottom of the ocean, climbing mountains with a 21-year old, saving the world's dying languages, meeting our pre-human ancestors, dodging jaguars and snakes in Belize, and spreading Christianity across the known world.

HOUR 1

• National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen followed up his famous video of being fed by a leopard seal with another, less nurturing experience. This year, he was photographing Emperor penguins in the Ross Sea when he noticed a seal watching him from the water. In the next instant, the seal launched itself from the sea and knocked him flat on his back. He tells Boyd about his surprising encounter.

• On the heels of World Water Day, Boyd chats with National Geographic Freshwater Fellow Sandra Postel to hear about ways we can help conserve water. Postel points out that we consume water in ways that we don't even consider, from the food we eat to the clothes we wear.

• Earlier this week, National Geographic Explorer in Residence James Cameron broke the world record for the deepest-ever dive in a solo sub. National Geographic Mission Programs Executive Vice President, Terry Garcia, joins Boyd to discuss the significance of the dive, marking a "golden age of exploration."

• Shortly after another National Geographic Weekend guest, Jason Kruk, removed the bolts from Patagonia's Cerro Torre, 21-year old David Lama completed the first true free ascent of the mountain's southeast ridge. Lama tells Boyd how he was relieved to complete the climb after his third attempt in as many years.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss tiny camels found in Central America's jungles.

HOUR 2

David Harrison watches the days go by with a sense of urgency. Every two weeks, the world loses another indigenous language. As a linguist on the Enduring Voices Project, the National Geographic Fellow records speakers of these dying languages to preserve them for posterity. He says that in some instances, youth are learning the languages of their grandparents if only for a little extra privacy with their friends.

• Richard Leakey lives in the presence of man's early ancestors. John Heminway, who directed and produced the documentary Bones of Turkana, which premiered at the recent Environmental Film Festival, tells Boyd about Leakey's drive to discover the roots of humanity. He tells Boyd about his time in Kenya with the Leakey family and highlights all they have accomplished over the last 40 years.

• Howler monkeys aren't known for their intelligence. Spider monkeys are much brighter, but harder to study. National Geographic grantee Mary Pavelka explains the ups and downs of studying primates in Central America. Pavelka tells Boyd that the hardest part of studying the monkeys in the treetops is keeping an eye out for the poisonous snakes on the ground as well.

• It took 2,000 years, but just a dozen believers spread the word to over two billion people. Andrew Todhunter, author of "The Apostles", National Geographic magazine's March 2012 cover story, explained that in most cases, the apostles gave their lives for their faith in disparate parts of the known world.

• In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd shares stories of his own experiences in submarines as well as an experiment to see just how great the pressure is at depth.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1214—Air Date: April 1, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Paul Nicklen

    National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen followed up his famous video of being fed by a leopard seal with another, less nurturing experience. This year, he was photographing Emperor penguins in the Ross Sea when he noticed a seal watching him from the water. In the next instant, the seal launched itself from the sea, and knocked him flat on his back. He tells Boyd about his surprising encounter.

  • 00:09:00 Sandra Postel

    On the heels of World Water Day, Boyd chats with National Geographic Freshwater Fellow, Sandra Postel, to hear about ways we can help conserve water. Postel points out that we consume water in ways that we don't even consider, from the food we eat to the clothes we wear.

  • 00:06:00 Terry Garcia

    Earlier this week, National Geographic Explorer in Residence James Cameron broke the world record for the deepest ever dive in a solo sub. National Geographic Mission Programs Executive Vice President, Terry Garcia, joins Boyd to discuss the significance of the dive, marking a "golden age of exploration".

  • 00:08:00 David Lama

    Shortly after another National Geographic Weekend guest, Jason Kruk, removed the bolts from Patagonia's Cerro Torre, 21-year old David Lama completed the first true free ascent of the mountain's southeast ridge. Lama tells Boyd how he was relieved on to complete the climb after his 3rd attempt in as many years.

  • 00:03:50 News - April 1

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss tiny camels found in Central America's jungles.

  • 00:11:00 David Harrison

    David Harrison watches the days go by with a sense of urgency. Every two weeks, the world loses another indigenous language. As a linguist on the Enduring Voices Project, the National Geographic Fellow records speakers of these dying languages to preserve them for posterity. He says that in some instances, youth are learning the languages of their grandparents if only for a little extra privacy with their friends.

  • 00:09:00 John Heminway

    Richard Leakey lives in the presence of man's early ancestors. John Heminway, who directed and produced the documentary Bones of Turkana which premiered at the recent Environmental Film Fest, tells Boyd about Leakey's drive to discover the roots of humanity. He tells Boyd about his time in Kenya with the Leakey family and highlights all they have accomplished over the last 40 years.

  • 00:06:00 Mary Pavelka

    Howler monkeys aren't known for their intelligence. Spider monkeys are much brighter, but harder to study. National Geographic grantee Mary Pavelka explains the ups and downs of studying primates in Central America. Pavelka tells Boyd that the hardest part of studying the monkeys in the treetops is keeping an eye out for the poisonous snakes on the ground as well.

  • 00:08:00 Andrew Todhunter

    It took 2,000 years, but just a dozen believers spread the word to over two billion people. Andrew Todhunter, author of National Geographic magazine's March cover story, explained that in most cases, the apostles gave their lives for their faith in disparate parts of the known world.

  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd shares stories of his own experiences in submarines as well as an experiment to see just how great the pressure is at depth.