Episode 1241—Air Date: October 7, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we bike around the San Francisco Bay playing concerts, catch infectious diseases from animals, decide whether to join the Navy or head to jail, live in the same house as the remains of our dead ancestors, chase a kudu until it drops dead, photograph surfers in the middle of winter in Norway, and travel up the Pacific coast to find its hidden gems.

HOUR 1

  • Doctors treat their patients' bodies; musicians treat people's souls. Rupa Marya with her band The April Fishes treats both. A physician and professor of internal medicine by training, Rupa calls society "build the kind of community ties that I want," in her band's newest album,Build. They recently toured around the San Francisco Bay, bicycling from concert to concert, using energy generated by the bicycles to power amps for their nightly performances. Rupa tells Boyd that traveling slowly gives her an opportunity to see how people live, whose stories she often turns into song. The band played the album's title track in NG Weekend's studio during their visit.
  • Throughout history, diseases have consistently jumped from animals to man. David Quammen details the history of zoonotic diseases in his new book, Spillover. He tells Boyd that as humans continue to encroach on habitats formerly left to animals, diseases that jump from animals to humans will happen more often. Quammen says this could spark the next human pandemic. HIV and the Bubonic plague are two diseases that began in animals, but Quammen said that scientists consider humans lucky that various avian flu strains and SARS have proven to be containable this far.
  • "It's hard to care about something if you don't feel connected to it," is a saying that National Geographic Fellow Jon Waterhouse likes to use when he describes his work. When he was in the Navy, he befriended a Native American who helped him through his time in the service. Through his connection to his friend, Waterhouse wanted to help Native tribes reconnect to the nature that they found around them. He does so by his Healing Journeys to rivers to "take their pulse," and help restore them to their former pristine conditions.
  • Nine thousand years ago, citizens ofÇatalhöyük (in modern-day Turkey), had a different relationship with their dead ancestors. They built their homes directly above the old homes - and burial sites - of their ancestors. National Geographic grantee and archaeologistIan Hoddertells Boyd that the ancestors were so close that they would likely be able to smell them.
  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that bears have been found to be able to count. Using food as a reward, scientists taught black bears to tally a number of dots and indicate the correct number on a computer screen.

HOUR 2

  • Louis Liebenberghas the distinction of being one of the few non tribesmen to join the San bush people on a hunt for kudu. They often use traditional persistence hunting methods to bring down kudus, using their ability to sweat and cool down their bodies, while kudus and other animals can't regulate their own temperatures as well. After two to five hours of running, the animal overheats and dies. He also developed Cybertracker, a GPS system that helps park rangers crowd source animal sightings and other "evidence" to map their whereabouts.
  • Norway and Russia's northern shores won't be added to every surfer's bucket list, but photographer Chris Burkard compares the remote beaches to a climber making a first ascent. He said that surfers want to be known as the first to conquer remote waves, even if it means braving water barely above freezing. He tells Boyd that the only thing colder than surfing these waves is photographing the surfing. He has to sit in the water and let the waves crash over him, while the surfers are able to pop out and ride their boards.
  • Rupa and the April Fishes return to the studio to play "sur la route,"from their new album Build.
  • Many people would love to take a month off, hit the road and see all of the things that don't appear on the average tourist's "To Do" list. This past summer, National Geographic explorer Shannon Switzer did exactly that, taking in Salvation Mountain, the Pinball Hall of Fame and the Pacific Coast's best cocktail. (Be warned, the cocktail may induce short-term memory loss.)
  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment,Boyd reflects on the global nature of music. He observes that it can unite people from disparate cultures, regardless of whether or not we know the words.

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Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1241—Air Date: October 7, 2012

  • Doctors treat their patients' bodies; musicians treat people's souls. Rupa Marya with her band The April Fishes treats both. A physician and professor of internal medicine by training, Rupa calls society "build the kind of community ties that I want," in her band's newest album, Build. They recently toured around the San Francisco Bay, bicycling from concert to concert, using energy generated by the bicycles to power amps for their nightly performances. Rupa tells Boyd that traveling slowly gives her an opportunity to see how people live, whose stories she often turns into song. The band played the album's title track in NG Weekend's studio during their visit.

  • 00:09:00 David Quammen

    Throughout history, diseases have consistently jumped from animals to man. David Quammen details the history of zoonotic diseases in his new book, Spillover. He tells Boyd that as humans continue to encroach on habitats formerly left to animals, diseases that jump from animals to humans will happen more often. Quammen says this could spark the next human pandemic. HIV and the Bubonic plague are two diseases that began in animals, but Quammen said that scientists consider humans lucky that various avian flu strains and SARS have proven to be containable this far.

  • 00:06:00 Jon Waterhouse

    "It's hard to care about something if you don't feel connected to it," is a saying that National Geographic Fellow Jon Waterhouse likes to use when he describes his work. When he was in the Navy, he befriended a Native American who helped him through his time in the service. Through his connection to his friend, Waterhouse wanted to help Native tribes reconnect to the nature that they found around them. He does so by his Healing Journeys to rivers to "take their pulse," and help restore them to their former pristine conditions.

  • 00:08:00 Ian Hodder

    Nine thousand years ago, citizens of Çatalhöyük (in modern-day Turkey), had a different relationship with their dead ancestors. They built their homes directly above the old homes - and burial sites - of their ancestors. National Geographic grantee and archaeologist Ian Hodder tells Boyd that the ancestors were so close that they would likely be able to smell them.

  • 00:03:50 News - October 7

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that bears have been found to be able to count. Using food as a reward, scientists taught black bears to tally a number of dots and indicate the correct number on a computer screen.

  • 00:11:00 Louis Liebenberg

    Louis Liebenberg has the distinction of being one of the few non tribesmen to join the San bush people on a hunt for kudu. They often use traditional persistence hunting methods to bring down kudus, using their ability to sweat and cool down their bodies, while kudus and other animals can't regulate their own temperatures as well. After two to five hours of running, the animal overheats and dies. He also developed Cybertracker, a GPS system that helps park rangers crowd source animal sightings and other "evidence" to map their whereabouts.

  • 00:09:00 Chris Burkard

    Norway and Russia's northern shores won't be added to every surfer's bucket list, but photographer Chris Burkard compares the remote beaches to a climber making a first ascent. He said that surfers want to be known as the first to conquer remote waves, even if it means braving water barely above freezing. He tells Boyd that the only thing colder than surfing these waves is photographing the surfing. He has to sit in the water and let the waves crash over him, while the surfers are able to pop out and ride their boards.

  • Rupa and the April Fishes return to the studio to play "sur la route," from their new album Build.

  • 00:08:00 Shannon Switzer

    Many people would love to take a month off, hit the road and see all of the things that don't appear on the average tourist's "To Do" list. This past summer, National Geographic explorer Shannon Switzer did exactly that, taking in Salvation Mountain, the Pinball Hall of Fame and the Pacific Coast's best cocktail. (Be warned, the cocktail may induce short-term memory loss.)

  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd reflects on the global nature of music. He observes that it can unite people from disparate cultures, regardless of whether or not we know the words.