<p><b>Best For: </b>Getting away from it all</p> <p><b>The Campground: </b>It’s no new revelation that the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is far more low-key than the South Rim with all of its development and crowds. The good news is, that dynamic won’t change that much because the North Rim is so remote: It’s a 212-mile drive to the visitors center from the South Rim (or a 24-mile, 10,500-vertical-foot hike). Tuweep is even more remote than that. The nine-site campground requires drives of 61, 56, or 91 miles down dirt roads that require high-clearance vehicles and can be impassible in mud. Plus, the Park Service makes clear that this campground has “no water, gas, food, lodging, or phone.” But if that kind of isolation is what you want, you’ll be in the right place.</p> <p><b>What's Out Your Door: </b>The views from the campground itself are stunning enough, but drive out to the Toroweap Overlook, where the cliff edge drops 3,000 feet straight down to the Colorado River, and wander along the six-mile round-trip loop of the Tuckup Trail, which skirts the rim deep in the park’s backcountry.</p> <p><b>Book It:</b> Camping is by permit only (submit a permit request up to four months in advance), and campers must arrive before sunset.</p>

Tuweep, North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Best For: Getting away from it all

The Campground: It’s no new revelation that the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is far more low-key than the South Rim with all of its development and crowds. The good news is, that dynamic won’t change that much because the North Rim is so remote: It’s a 212-mile drive to the visitors center from the South Rim (or a 24-mile, 10,500-vertical-foot hike). Tuweep is even more remote than that. The nine-site campground requires drives of 61, 56, or 91 miles down dirt roads that require high-clearance vehicles and can be impassible in mud. Plus, the Park Service makes clear that this campground has “no water, gas, food, lodging, or phone.” But if that kind of isolation is what you want, you’ll be in the right place.

What's Out Your Door: The views from the campground itself are stunning enough, but drive out to the Toroweap Overlook, where the cliff edge drops 3,000 feet straight down to the Colorado River, and wander along the six-mile round-trip loop of the Tuckup Trail, which skirts the rim deep in the park’s backcountry.

Book It: Camping is by permit only (submit a permit request up to four months in advance), and campers must arrive before sunset.

Photograph by Michele Falzone, Corbis Images

10 Best Campgrounds in the Parks

There are few better traditions in the United States than taking to the road and pulling into a national park campground for a few nights of adventure. Of course, the parks can be crowded, so the best spots to pitch a tent are off the beaten trail, where they immerse you a bit deeper into the landscape and unique history that make these parks national treasures. Dig into our picks below and start planning your spring break and summer vacation now. —Doug Schnitzspahn

Read This Next

To regrow forests, the U.S. needs many more 'seed hunters'
How Berlin’s club scene is weathering the pandemic
Why you shouldn’t panic over the Omicron variant

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet