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What Energy Solution to Develop Next?

Renewables, natural gas, a yet-to-be discovered breakthrough... with competing options on the table, what energy solution should we be focusing on now?

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Hydrogen storage research at Brookhaven National Lab on Long Island, New York

Some of the people who could shape the energy future have a maddening aversion to playing favorites.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the U.S. presidential race, where President Barack Obama endorses "all of the above" energy strategy, the same approach, word-for-word, touted by the opposition Republican party. The GOP presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, is a tad more specific, placing greater emphasis on the U.S. "cornucopia of carbon-based resources."

The questions of where to put investment dollars and how to prioritize new energy sources are being asked around the world, including at our live Big Energy Question event series, where a group of experts gathered in Brazil to ponder what the right energy mix is for that country (see video perspectives from that event in November 2014 here).

Here are just a few examples of proposed next energy directions, as expressed by their strong advocates. How do you rate these ideas, and why? We will follow up with a look at your feedback and what the experts say about setting priorities on energy.

What's the best next energy solution? Give your rating for the answers below and share your thoughts in the comments.