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The Concepción is shown sinking on the coral heads.
DIAGRAM OF WRECK

As Admiral Villavicencio wrote in his report: “At 8:30 that night [October 31, 1641] the galleon struck bottom and ran upon two or three rocky heads....Having set out an anchor, we stood between them until the next day.” The crew wrested the galleon from the coral heads by attempting to move it further seaward to make lifesaving repairs. They steered and pulled the ship with a longboat and dropped anchors to hold the ship’s position. When all of the anchors were lost to their labors, they threw the ship’s cannon overboard, using them as anchors. But they were unable to save the ship.

On November 2 “at daybreak with the water up to the beams and the bow under water, we dragged until the stern came upon a rocky head, where it remained seated upon it.” From that time until it broke apart nine days later, the Concepción gave little shelter to passengers and crew.



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