A painting of Christine seated at a table writing

This single working mom was Europe's first professional woman writer

Christine de Pisan upended medieval norms not only by refusing to remarry but also by being the first woman to make a living with her pen.

Christine de Pisan helped craft the beautifully illustrated manuscripts of her literary creations. Using her experience as manager of a scriptorium, she oversaw the work of skilled miniaturists to produce these detailed images. In some editions she is often the subject of the illustrations. In a 15th-century edition of her 1405 work One Hundred Ballads of a Lover and a Lady, she is shown working in her study (left). As in this image, she is often shown wearing a long blue dress and a white wimple, the standard attire across many other portraits of her.
BRIDGEMAN/ACI
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