Meet Supercontinent Pangaea Proxima—in 250 Million Years

Our maps show how Earth's mountains collide and oceans swirl as a new landmass takes shape.

The continents are in constant motion: Tectonic plates crash together and break apart, creating new crust while old crust is pulled below the surface. The process shrinks and widens oceans, uplifts mountain ranges, and rearranges landmasses. In about 250 million years a new supercontinent, Pangaea Proxima, will form.

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