East Africa: Photos from the Tarangire Bush

Earlier this week, we went into the bush of Tanzania near Tarangire National Park to see some wildlife and learn about an innovative effort to protect some of the world’s most majestic mammals. We met up with American expat and conservationist Laly Lichtenfeld, who built the African People and Wildlife Fund to help rescue the area’s disappearing populations of lions, cheetahs and leopards. We’ll have much more to report on Laly and East Africa this weekend. In the mean time, here are our favorite shots from our safari—the Swahili word that simply means “journey.”

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Conservationist and National Geographic grantee Laly Lichtenfeld shows off one of her favorite hills for wildlife spotting near Tarangire National Park.
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The house of one Maasai family in the village of Loibor Siret. The writing on the right side of the wall celebrates a recent marriage in the family.
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Two young Maasai boys ask to have their picture taken. They wanted to see what they looked like immediately after.
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Maasai elder Lazaro Looyo installs fencing to his boma, which at night will keep lions and other carnivores away from his flock.
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During the day, Maasai herd boys wander with the flock for the animals to graze. At night, without sturdy fencing, the herd can be attacked by carnivores.
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Lions hunt primarily at night and sleep—sometimes in tall grass near Tarangire National Park—during the day.
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On alert, one lioness watches a nearby group of zebras.
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In the dry season, mammals like these buffalo gather where there’s water.
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African elephants are accustomed to the passing trucks of safari tourists. But one foot slightly bent signals some discomfort.
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Lichtenfeld points out a mother and baby elephant. Behind them is a group of warthogs.
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Eastern Tanzania is primarily tribal land and wildlife habitat.