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Our Very #BerryRoadTrip

Today, we’re kicking off a road trip across America. The goal is to learn something about food distribution—how what you eat gets to you—and the massive logistical system that keeps trucks moving 24/7 to your grocery store.

Spencer and I will literally follow a shipment of strawberries as it barrels across the U.S. For your fruit to show up looking perfect, it has to stay cool and move quickly, sometimes around the clock. We’ll stay on the truck’s bumper and try to keep the same day-and-night schedule as the truckers who haul food for a living. They do a quiet and thankless job, but it’s a fascinating one.

Why strawberries? There’s no more quintessential American fruit. Americans eat more strawberries (both total and per capita) than any other country, and the fruit itself is full of juice, character, and history. It doesn’t hurt that I once worked on a strawberry farm. I intend to explain advanced seed genetics to Spencer during hour 32, after the license plate game and before another round of 20 Questions.

We don’t expect to see much along the way (cornfields!) except how the process happens. We’ll be reporting from the road and  from truck stops while guzzling America’s most potent coffee. Follow along with #berryroadtrip. At the end, before we come down from our caffeine highs, we’ll produce a multimedia package about food distribution in America. For now, come along for the ride. Good music playlists gladly accepted.