Illustration by NASA, JPL/ Cornell University
Read Caption

A NASA Mars Exploration Rover sits on the surface of Mars in an illustration. Twin versions of this rover, Spirit and Opportunity, launched in 2003 and arrived at different sites on Mars in January 2004.

Illustration by NASA, JPL/ Cornell University

The Mars rover Opportunity is dead. Here's what it gave humankind.

The spacecraft lasted more than 50 times longer than originally planned, delivering groundbreaking science and inspiring a generation.

After more than 14 years driving across the surface of Mars, the NASA rover Opportunity has fallen silent—marking the end of a defining mission to another world.

At a press conference at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, NASA bid farewell to the rover it placed on Mars on January 25, 2004: before Facebook, before the iPhone, and even before some of the scientists now in charge of it graduated high school. In its record-breaking time on Mars, the rover drove more than 28 miles, finding some of the first definitive signs of past liquid water on the red planet's surface.

“With this mission, more than other robotic missions, we have made that human bond, so saying goodbye is a lot harder. But at the same time, we have to remember this phenomenal accomplishment—this historic exploration we've done,” says John Callas, the project manager for the Mars Exploration Rovers mission. “I think it'll be a long time before any mission surpasses what we were able to do.”

NASA had not heard from the rover since June 2018, when one of the most severe dust storms ever observed on Mars blotted out much of the red planet's sky and overtook the solar-powered rover. Initially, the storm didn't give the team pause. From about November to January, the red planet saw seasonal winds strong enough to wipe accumulated dust from Opportunity's solar panels, which is one of the major reasons the rover lasted so long in the first place. But when “rover cleaning” season came and went without signals from Opportunity, hopes that it had survived began to dim.

Mars 101 From its blood-like hue to its potential to sustain life, Mars has intrigued humankind for thousands of years. Learn how the red planet formed from gas and dust and what its polar ice caps mean for life as we know it.

On January 25, the team sent Opportunity a set of last-ditch commands, hoping that the rover had fallen silent because of malfunctioning antennae and an internal clock on the fritz. But the commands meant to fix this admittedly unlikely scenario didn't wake the rover.

Now, as Martian fall and winter overtake it, NASA says that the rover will remain forever paused halfway down a windswept gully, named Perseverance Valley for the rover's dogged effort.

View Images
500 Error reading 'isEmpty' on type com.nationalgeographic.componentry.sling.model.promo.BetaRelatedContentListPromo

Error reading 'isEmpty' on type com.nationalgeographic.componentry.sling.model.promo.BetaRelatedContentListPromo

Cannot serve request to /content/science/en_US/2019/02/nasa-mars-rover-opportunity-dead-what-it-gave-humankind.html on this server