<p>From late September through early October, north-central <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/united-states/new-mexico-guide/" target="_blank">New Mexico</a>’s Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway is a best-of-fall highlight reel. For those beginning and ending the drive in Taos (basically circling the state’s highest point, 13,162-foot Wheeler Peak), the 83-mile loop offers spectacular natural features: golden-hued aspens, thick evergreen forests, and abundant wildlife, including Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. “An early snow can make the spectacle even more amazing,” says Fritz Davis, a local musician and editor of the <i>Red River Miner</i>. “The fall palette of red, orange, and gold beneath distant snowy peaks and around the high mountain lake is breathtaking.” It’s possible to make the drive in a couple of hours, but Davis recommends taking time to explore side roads. One of his favorites is the Route 578 fork off Main Street (Highway 38) in Red River, where the vibrant aspen leaves take on a butterfly shape each fall. “You’ll see either a single butterfly with wings spread wide or, if you’re romantically inclined, two butterflies kissing,” says Davis.</p> <p><b>How to Get Around:</b> Begin in Taos and drive clockwise around the loop. From downtown Taos, head north on NM 64/68 to NM 522. Continue north on NM 522 for about 24 miles to Questa and turn right (east) on NM 38. Continue east and then south on NM 38 about 30 miles to Eagle’s Nest. Here, you’ll rejoin NM 64 to complete the circle back to Taos.</p> <p><b>Where to Stay:</b> The recently renovated <a href="http://www.marquesataos.com" target="_blank">Palacio de Marquesa</a> (formerly Casa de las Chimeneas) is a romantic, pueblo-style retreat. Surrounded by cottonwood trees in a quiet neighborhood, the 1912 adobe estate is within easy walking distance (about ten minutes) of shops, restaurants, and galleries at <a href="http://taos.org/art/taos-plaza" target="_blank">Taos Plaza</a>. The inn’s eight guest rooms (two of which are suites) are individually appointed to reflect the spirit of a legendary Taos woman artist such as Georgia O’Keeffe and Millicent Rogers. Each room has a fireplace and courtyard access, some have beamed ceilings and skylights, and all include complimentary breakfast, which can be delivered directly to your door.</p> <p><b>Where to Eat:</b> At family-owned <a href="http://www.angelfirefun.com/businesses/view/301" target="_blank">Hatcha’s Grill of Angel Fire</a>, order an authentic New Mexican dish such as sopaipillas (fried pastries) stuffed with <i>carne adovada</i> (cubed pork in red chile sauce) or a steak and <i>papitas</i> (fried potato) burrito. Eat like a local by asking for it “smothered with Xmas.” Christmas, or Xmas, is a spicy, red-green New Mexico concoction made by blending mild (red) and hot (green) chile sauces.</p> <p><b>What to Buy:</b> Find genuine turquoise and sterling silver pendants, rings, cuff bracelets, earrings, and other pieces designed by Native American and other New Mexico artists at the <a href="http://www.jewelryladyredriver.com" target="_blank">Jewelry Lady Red River</a> in Frye’s Old Town.</p> <p><b>What to Read Before You Go:</b> D.H. Lawrence penned parts of his 1927 travel essay collection <i><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Mornings-Mexico-D-H-Lawrence/dp/1845118685/ref=pd_sim_sbs_b_2?ie=UTF8&amp;refRID=0HYEAWJCG9M1NJ60PJ25" target="_blank">Mornings in Mexico</a> </i>(Tauris Park Paperbacks, 2009) during the 11 months he lived on his ranch northwest of Taos. Owned by the University of New Mexico (and open to the public through October), the D.H. Lawrence Ranch is located on the Enchanted Circle roughly midway between Taos and Questa.</p> <p><b>Helpful Tip:</b> Take it slow and stay alert for changing weather conditions and wildlife on or near the road. Before making the drive, check the weather forecast for the entire route and plan accordingly. Curves on the two-lane route can become slick in wet or snowy conditions, and some sections of the road have little or no shoulders.</p> <p><b>Helpful Links:</b> <a href="http://www.newmexico.org" target="_blank">New Mexico Tourism</a> and <a href="http://www.enchantedcircle.org" target="_blank">Enchanted Circle</a></p> <p><b>Fun Fact:</b> One must-see Enchanted Circle detour is the <a href="http://www.blm.gov/nm/st/en/prog/recreation/taos/rio_grande_wsr.html" target="_blank">Rio Grande Gorge Bridge</a>, located 12 miles northwest of Taos on U.S. 64 (8 miles west of the NM 522 and NM 150 junction). Completed in 1965 and restored in 2012, the steel bridge is the second highest suspension bridge in the U.S., towering 650 feet above the Rio Grande River. For the most dramatic gorge views, park in the lot at the west end of the bridge and walk (staying on the walkways) out to the center.</p>

Enchanted Circle Scenic Drive, Taos, New Mexico

From late September through early October, north-central New Mexico’s Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway is a best-of-fall highlight reel. For those beginning and ending the drive in Taos (basically circling the state’s highest point, 13,162-foot Wheeler Peak), the 83-mile loop offers spectacular natural features: golden-hued aspens, thick evergreen forests, and abundant wildlife, including Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. “An early snow can make the spectacle even more amazing,” says Fritz Davis, a local musician and editor of the Red River Miner. “The fall palette of red, orange, and gold beneath distant snowy peaks and around the high mountain lake is breathtaking.” It’s possible to make the drive in a couple of hours, but Davis recommends taking time to explore side roads. One of his favorites is the Route 578 fork off Main Street (Highway 38) in Red River, where the vibrant aspen leaves take on a butterfly shape each fall. “You’ll see either a single butterfly with wings spread wide or, if you’re romantically inclined, two butterflies kissing,” says Davis.

How to Get Around: Begin in Taos and drive clockwise around the loop. From downtown Taos, head north on NM 64/68 to NM 522. Continue north on NM 522 for about 24 miles to Questa and turn right (east) on NM 38. Continue east and then south on NM 38 about 30 miles to Eagle’s Nest. Here, you’ll rejoin NM 64 to complete the circle back to Taos.

Where to Stay: The recently renovated Palacio de Marquesa (formerly Casa de las Chimeneas) is a romantic, pueblo-style retreat. Surrounded by cottonwood trees in a quiet neighborhood, the 1912 adobe estate is within easy walking distance (about ten minutes) of shops, restaurants, and galleries at Taos Plaza. The inn’s eight guest rooms (two of which are suites) are individually appointed to reflect the spirit of a legendary Taos woman artist such as Georgia O’Keeffe and Millicent Rogers. Each room has a fireplace and courtyard access, some have beamed ceilings and skylights, and all include complimentary breakfast, which can be delivered directly to your door.

Where to Eat: At family-owned Hatcha’s Grill of Angel Fire, order an authentic New Mexican dish such as sopaipillas (fried pastries) stuffed with carne adovada (cubed pork in red chile sauce) or a steak and papitas (fried potato) burrito. Eat like a local by asking for it “smothered with Xmas.” Christmas, or Xmas, is a spicy, red-green New Mexico concoction made by blending mild (red) and hot (green) chile sauces.

What to Buy: Find genuine turquoise and sterling silver pendants, rings, cuff bracelets, earrings, and other pieces designed by Native American and other New Mexico artists at the Jewelry Lady Red River in Frye’s Old Town.

What to Read Before You Go: D.H. Lawrence penned parts of his 1927 travel essay collection Mornings in Mexico (Tauris Park Paperbacks, 2009) during the 11 months he lived on his ranch northwest of Taos. Owned by the University of New Mexico (and open to the public through October), the D.H. Lawrence Ranch is located on the Enchanted Circle roughly midway between Taos and Questa.

Helpful Tip: Take it slow and stay alert for changing weather conditions and wildlife on or near the road. Before making the drive, check the weather forecast for the entire route and plan accordingly. Curves on the two-lane route can become slick in wet or snowy conditions, and some sections of the road have little or no shoulders.

Helpful Links: New Mexico Tourism and Enchanted Circle

Fun Fact: One must-see Enchanted Circle detour is the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge, located 12 miles northwest of Taos on U.S. 64 (8 miles west of the NM 522 and NM 150 junction). Completed in 1965 and restored in 2012, the steel bridge is the second highest suspension bridge in the U.S., towering 650 feet above the Rio Grande River. For the most dramatic gorge views, park in the lot at the west end of the bridge and walk (staying on the walkways) out to the center.

Photograph by Terry Thompson, Alamy

Best Fall Trips 2014

The end of the bustling summer tourist season kicks off one of the best times of the year to travel. Whether you’re up for adventure, relaxation, or something in between, check out our editors’ list of 10 best fall trips for inspired ideas. —Maryellen Kennedy Duckett

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