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Street Food Photo Gallery

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I can’t really tell right now if I’m hungry because it’s close to lunchtime, or because I’ve been staring at this amazing gallery of street food over at NationalGeographic.com’s new travel website. All I know is that I need to eat, and soon. And preferably from a cart of some kind. Here are a few of my favorites from the gallery. What’s your favorite kind of street food?

Photograph by Neil Wade, My Shot

Chilung’s Miaokou Night Market has an old temple at its center, but the main focus here is feasting. The market’s yellow lanterns illuminate a mouthwatering array of traditional Taiwanese snack foods, including savory noodle soups, oyster omelets, snails, sticky rice, and tripe.

Taiwanese and tourists alike say no visit is complete without a fruity “bubble ice” dessert–black plum is a local favorite.

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Phototograph by Cezary Wojtkowski, My Shot

Glasses filled to the rim with mint, and a healthy helping of sugar, stand ready for the preparation of Morocco’s distinctive green tea. The beverage refreshes the spirit on a hot day in Marrakech, but it’s far more than a thirst quencher. The tea’s preparation and enjoyment are an essential part of the Moroccan culture and a “must-try” experience for any visitor.Photograph by Boaz Meiri, My Shot

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Photograph by Boaz Meiri, My Shot

Chinese street foods, like this “bouquet” of skewered grasshoppers, often raise Western eyebrows. But insect eating isn’t as unusual as you might imagine. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that more than 1,400 protein-rich insect species are regularly enjoyed by humans around the world.


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