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Greenland Guide





Hiker

A hiker pauses in front of Ilulissat Icefjord, which is about 25 miles (40 kilometers) long and 3,937 feet (1,200 meters) deep.
Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

| Greenland Web
Resources
|

 

See the print edition for Diane Cook and Len Jenshel’s photo-essay on Greenland. Here are fast facts on the country and listings of related Web resources.

If you’ve traveled to Greenland, e-mail us about your trip at traveler@
nationalgeographic.com
. We may feature your letter at some point in the print edition’s “Travel Talk” section.

Cruisers

During August’s midnight sun, cruisers catch a close-up of the icebergs while gliding across Disko Bay.
Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Ice
The Ilulissat glacier produces about 20 million tons of ice per day—enough to supply New York City with water for a year • Greenland boasts the Northern Hemisphere’s largest ice sheet—694, 981 square miles (1.8 million square kilometers)—which covers 85 percent of its total area • Humboldt, its largest glacier, is 62 miles (100 kilometers) wide and 164 to 328 feet (50 to 100 meters) thick.

Land
At 3.7 billion years, Greenland’s rocks are among the oldest on Earth • It’s the world’s largest island at 810,810 square miles (2.1 million square kilometers) • Two-thirds of Greenland lies in the Arctic Circle • At 193,050 square miles (500,000 square kilometers), North-East Greenland National Park is the world’s largest national park.

People and Culture
Erik the Red, founder of Greenland’s first European settlement, selected the name “Greenland” to make Icelandic colonists think the land would be fertile and rich, though only one percent of Greenland’s land is pastureland • In the 10th century A.D., the kayak was developed as a hunting boat by the Thule, a prehistoric culture. Mattak (whale blubber) is a popular Greenlandic delicacy.

—Carrie Miller

Carrie Miller is a TRAVELER associate researcher.

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