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A 750-Year-Old Secret: See How Soy Sauce Is Made

In the 13th century, a Japanese priest returned from a trip to China and settled in the small, coastal town of Yuasa in Japan’s Wakayama Prefecture. He brought with him several new skills that he had learned from the Chinese, including a process for making miso (a soybean paste). The liquid byproduct of this miso-making process was eventually adopted by the people of Yuasa as a condiment of its own—giving birth to what we know today as soy sauce.

See how Japanese soy sauce has been made for 750 years in this fascinating short film by Mile Nagaoka.

The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the world and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. To submit a film for consideration, please email sfs@natgeo.com. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.