See How Technology is Changing Traditional Teenage Dating in Cambodia

Cambodia is home to just over 20 ethnic minorities, with the Kreung being one of the country's largest groups. Traditionally, Kreung girls and boys approaching adolescence were given their own private huts outside the family home. These “Bride and Groom huts” often incorrectly referred to as “love huts” gave teenagers a chance to live independently and experiment with premarital sex without judgement or social stigma. Now, as a result of mobile technology, there is no need for young people to stay overnight in personal huts, as they may have done in previous generations. Cell phones are making it faster and simpler to communicate with potential love interests, which is changing the dynamics of dating. Filmmaker Charlotte Pert shares one young couple's story in this fascinating short about the evolution of courtship in Cambodia.

See Charlotte's photo essay Calling for Love
Follow Charlotte on Vimeo and YouTube
Instagram: @charleypert
https://video.nationalgeographic.com/tv/taboo/cambodian-love-huts
https://untoldcambodia.com/

The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the world and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. To submit a film for consideration, please email sfs@natgeo.com. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

See How Technology is Changing Traditional Teenage Dating in Cambodia

Cambodia is home to just over 20 ethnic minorities, with the Kreung being one of the country's largest groups. Traditionally, Kreung girls and boys approaching adolescence were given their own private huts outside the family home. These “Bride and Groom huts” often incorrectly referred to as “love huts” gave teenagers a chance to live independently and experiment with premarital sex without judgement or social stigma. Now, as a result of mobile technology, there is no need for young people to stay overnight in personal huts, as they may have done in previous generations. Cell phones are making it faster and simpler to communicate with potential love interests, which is changing the dynamics of dating. Filmmaker Charlotte Pert shares one young couple's story in this fascinating short about the evolution of courtship in Cambodia.

See Charlotte's photo essay Calling for Love
Follow Charlotte on Vimeo and YouTube
Instagram: @charleypert
https://video.nationalgeographic.com/tv/taboo/cambodian-love-huts
https://untoldcambodia.com/

The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the world and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. To submit a film for consideration, please email sfs@natgeo.com. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.