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Kids Take Action Against Ocean Plastic

Despite the vastness of Earth’s oceans, plastic pollutants are turning up everywhere, from the deep sea to the Arctic ice pack. Shockingly, researchers estimate that by 2050 the oceans will contain more plastic—by weight—than fish. As these degrading plastics leach potentially toxic chemicals into the seas, they pose a serious threat to ocean animals, as well as to humans.

To combat this frightening prognosis, Hawaii—among other places—is contemplating a ban on the sale and distribution of single-use polystyrene. In this short film from filmmaker Chris Hanson, 17 Hawaiian students study the impact of plastic pollution on their local beaches in order to help create a more sustainable future for the world’s oceans.

Follow Chris Hanson on Vimeo. Winner of the Film4Climate competition organized by the Connect4Climate Program of the World Bank (film4climate.net).

The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the world and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. To submit a film for consideration, please email sfs@natgeo.com. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.