<p>Nearly a century after Capt. Robert Falcon Scott explored the southern continent, experts are working to save the British explorer's wooden hut (pictured on Ross Island, <a id="y23k" title="Antarctica" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/places/continents/continent_antarctica.html">Antarctica</a>, in August 2006) and three others in the area from slipping under the snow forever.</p><p>The sanctuary measures 50 feet (15 meters) long and 25 feet (7.6 meters) wide and was built to house up to 33 men.</p><p>Scott and his crew stayed at the hut before their ill-fated Terra Nova expedition to the South Pole in January 1912. Scott and four others died after being beaten to the pole by <a id="xmkz" title="Norwegian" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/norway-guide/">Norwegian</a> explorer Roald Amundsen.</p><p>"Had we lived," Scott wrote in March 1912 in a message found with his body, "I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman.”</p><p>--<em>Ker Than</em></p>

Scott's Hut

Nearly a century after Capt. Robert Falcon Scott explored the southern continent, experts are working to save the British explorer's wooden hut (pictured on Ross Island, Antarctica, in August 2006) and three others in the area from slipping under the snow forever.

The sanctuary measures 50 feet (15 meters) long and 25 feet (7.6 meters) wide and was built to house up to 33 men.

Scott and his crew stayed at the hut before their ill-fated Terra Nova expedition to the South Pole in January 1912. Scott and four others died after being beaten to the pole by Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen.

"Had we lived," Scott wrote in March 1912 in a message found with his body, "I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman.”

--Ker Than

Photograph from Barcroft/Fame Pictures

PHOTOS: Antarctic "Time Capsule" Hut Revealed

As snows threaten to bury the base forever, more than 8,000 artifacts—including butter and ketchup—have been revealed in the hut of ill-fated British explorer Robert Falcon Scott, according to preservationists.

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